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Patrick Semansky / AP

The new president took the dais on Friday afternoon for a short speech that painted a grim picture of our nation's present and offered a series of promises for its future.

The key quote: "This American carnage stops right here, and stops, right now."

Highlights below the fold.

  1. The president named his movement: "The forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer. Everyone is listening to you now."
  2. He praised those who put him in office: "At the center of this movement is a crucial conviction, that a nation exists to serve its citizens. Americans want great schools for their children, safe neighborhoods for their families, and great jobs for themselves."
  3. But was grim about the present: "For too many of our citizens a different reality exists... Mothers and children trapped in poverty in our inner cities... An education system flush with cash but leaves our young and beautiful students deprived of knowledge."
  4. Then his promises:"Protection will lead to great prosperity and strength.""We will bring back our borders.""We will bring back our wealth and we will bring back our dreams.""We will get our people off of welfare and back to work.""We will follow two simple rules: Buy American and hire American.""We will no longer accept politicians who are all talk and no action." "To all Americans in every city near and far... hear these words – you will never be ignored again.""From this day forward, it's going to be only America first. America first.""We will seek friendship and goodwill with the nations of the world – but we do so with the understanding that it is the right of all nations to put their own interests first. We do not seek to impose our way of life on anyone, but rather to let it shine as an example for everyone to follow.""We will reinforce old alliances and form new ones – and unite the civilized world against Radical Islamic Terrorism, which we will eradicate completely from the face of the Earth."
  5. He threw in some fancy language: "And whether a child is born in the urban sprawl of Detroit or the windswept plains of Nebraska, they look up at the same night sky, they fill their heart with the same dreams, and they are infused with the breath of life by the same almighty Creator."
  6. And his ending promise, no surprise: "Make America Great Again."

Go deeper

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Health: Most vulnerable Americans aren't getting enough vaccine information — Fauci says Trump administration's lack of facts on COVID "very likely" cost lives.
  2. Politics: Biden unveils "wartime" COVID strategyBiden's COVID-19 bubble.
  3. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
  4. World: Hong Kong to put tens of thousands on lockdown as cases surge.
  5. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.

Trump impeachment trial to start week of Feb. 8, Schumer says

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: The Washington Post via Getty

The Senate will begin former President Trump's impeachment trial the week of Feb. 8, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Friday on the Senate floor.

The state of play: Schumer announced the schedule after reaching an agreement with Republicans. The House will transmit the article of impeachment against the former president late Monday.

4 hours ago - Health

CDC extends interval between COVID vaccine doses for exceptional cases

Photo: Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty

Patients can space out the two doses of the coronavirus vaccine by up to six weeks if it’s "not feasible" to follow the shorter recommended window, according to updated guidance from the Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention.

Driving the news: With the prospect of vaccine shortages and a low likelihood that supply will expand before April, the latest changes could provide a path to vaccinate more Americans — a top priority for President Biden.