Mike Allen Feb 18
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Pod life: Dan Pfeiffer on his upcoming book

Courtesy Twelve, an imprint of Grand Central Publishing

Dan Pfeiffer — who served President Obama for eight years, from campaign to senior adviser, and now is a Crooked Media (Pod Save America) host and CNN contributor, living mostly in San Francisco — emailed with us about his book, "Yes We (Still) Can," coming June 19 from the prestige publisher Twelve:

  • "The conceit for the book is a Pod Save America-esque look at how Obama navigated the changes in our politics that eventually gave rise to Trump —including the radicalization of Republicans, changes in technology and media, Fox News and the right-wing media ecosystem."
  • The aim is to "divine some lessons for Democrats for the battles to come in 2018 and 2020."
  • "Started working on the idea for book the morning after the election while I was trying to process the result."
  • "The best part of the Pod Save America experience has been meeting people who are getting involved in politics for the first time, so if nothing else, I hope that some young people read the book and realize that despite how dark things may seem right now, politics is still the best way to make an impact in the world and decide to get jump into the fray."
  • The Pod guys have gone on the road to California, Washington State, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Virginia, D.C., Illinois, Nevada, Colorado and Arizona, and are headed to Texas in March and Florida in April.
  • Pfeiffer says founders Jon Favreau, Jon Lovett and Tommy Vietor "are the brains behind Crooked Media and deserve the credit for the company’s success. I spend my time on Pod Save America, this book, CNN and some side projects."
  • "I am donating a portion of the proceeds from every book sold in the pre-sale period to SwingLeft, which embodies the grassroots enthusiasm of the Left in the Trump era and has been a great partner to Crooked Media on a number of endeavors."
Haley Britzky 3 hours ago
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Zuckerberg happy to testify if it is "the right thing to do”

A portrait of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg
A portrait of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. Photo: Jaap Arriens / NurPhoto via Getty Images

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said he would be "happy" to testify before Congress if it was "the right thing to do," in an interview with CNN's Laurie Segall.

Why it matters: Facebook has been under the microscope lately for what Zuckerberg called earlier today the "Cambridge Analytica situation." Zuckerberg said if he was the "person...who will have the most knowledge," then he'd be the one to testify in the face of Facebook's data-collection situation.

Bob Herman 1 hour ago
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Jamie Dimon's $141 million payday

JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon speaks at an event.
JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon speaks at an event in 2016. Photo: Win McNamee / Getty Images

JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon took home more than $141 million in 2017 after calculating the actual realized value of his stock, according to a preliminary draft of the banking giant's annual proxy document. Dimon's compensation is calculated as $28.3 million when using the estimated fair value of his stock. But that compensation figure doesn't matter as much because it doesn't reflect what executives report in their personal income tax filings.

Why it matters: It's the highest pay package of any active corporate CEO from 2017, based on Securities and Exchange Commission documents that have been filed thus far. Dimon's compensation is also 1,818 times higher than what the average JPMorgan employee makes.