Advocates for safe injection sites rally in front of the James A Byrne Federal Courthouse in Center City, Philadelphia, on Sept. 5, 2019. Photo: Cory Clark/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The nation's first supervised drug-use site is set to open in Philadelphia next week, after a federal judge ruled Tuesday in favor of the nonprofit that plans to open it, the Wall Street Journal reports.

The big picture: Advocates of such sites say that they help prevent deadly overdoses while potentially helping connect users with treatment, but federal law enforcement officials have said that they think such sites are illegal. The Justice Department — which brought the lawsuit against the nonprofit — said it's appealing the decision.

Go deeper: Opioid death rate in the U.S. decreased in 2018

Editor's note: The image has been changed to reflect a rally the supervised drug-use site in Philadelphia.

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D.C. mayor asks Trump to withdraw military and federal law enforcement

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser. Photo: Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images

Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser formally requested in a letter dated Thursday that President Trump remove "all extraordinary federal law enforcement and military presence" in place due to the protests over the killing of George Floyd from the city.

The big picture: Tensions between protesters and law enforcement in the capital have died down this week, with the demonstrations becoming overwhelmingly peaceful. Bowser has ended both the district's curfew and state of emergency.

Barr claims "no correlation" between removing protesters and Trump's church photo op

Attorney General Bill Barr said at a press conference Thursday that there was "no correlation" between his decision to order police to forcibly remove protesters from Lafayette Park and President Trump's subsequent visit to St. John's Episcopal Church earlier this week.

Driving the news: Barr was asked to respond to comments from Defense Secretary Mark Esper, who said Tuesday that he "did not know a photo op was happening" and that he does everything he can to "try and stay out of situations that may appear political."

Black Lives Matter sues Trump, Barr for forcibly clearing White House protesters

President Trump with Esper and Barr following behind him. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Civil rights groups filed a lawsuit Thursday against President Trump, Attorney General Bill Barr and other federal officials on behalf of Black Lives Matter and other peaceful protesters who were forcibly removed with rubber bullets and chemical irritants before Trump's photo-op at the historic St. John’s Episcopal Church on Monday.

What they're saying: "The President's shameless, unconstitutional, unprovoked, and frankly criminal attack on protesters because he disagreed with their views shakes the foundation of our nation’s constitutional order," said ACLU of D.C. legal director Scott Michelman. "And when the nation's top law enforcement officer becomes complicit in the tactics of an autocrat, it chills protected speech for all of us."