Axios Mar 14
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Pennsylvania special election is down to the wire

Conor Lamb (C), The Democratic candidate at a rally last week. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Tuesday's special election in Pennsylvania's 18th district is too close to call with both candidates within one percentage point of each other. Democrat Conor Lamb is looking to beat out Republican Rick Saccone in a district President Trump carried by 20 points in 2016.

Where it stands:

  • Lamb (D): 49.8%
  • Saccone (R): 49.6%
    • 99% of precincts are currently reporting

What we're waiting for: Some absentee ballots are not expected to be counted until the morning and leaves open the possibility for the victory to sway to either candidate. With the votes differing within a few hundred ballots, there will likely be a recount.

About the race:

  • Tim Murphy, the Republican who held the seat for 15 years, resigned in October after it emerged he had urged a woman he was having an affair with to have an abortion.
  • Millions of dollars have been poured into the race, with Republican groups outspending Democrats by a big margin.
  • President Trump has privately bashed Saccone as a "weak" candidate, but would be hoping to avoid the critical headlines a Lamb win would spark. Trump spent his weekend in PA campaigning on Saccone's behalf.
  • Democrats, meanwhile, are desperate for an upset victory.

We will continue to update the results as they come in.

Dan Primack 1 hour ago
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Why the stock markets are tanking

Stock market trader adjusts his glasses.
Photo by Xinhua/Wang Ying via Getty Images

Stock markets are down sharply on Thursday, with the Dow Jones Industrial Average off around 1.25% as of 2 p.m. EST.

Three key drivers: Tariffs, inter-bank lending rates and Facebook's troubles.

Caitlin Owens 3 hours ago
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How Congress missed yet another chance for an immigration deal

Congressional leaders with President Trump
Congressional leaders with President Trump. Photo: Olivier Douliery - Pool / Getty Images

Congressional leaders and the White House failed to come to an agreement on temporary protections for Dreamers over the past week as part of the giant spending bill, leaving the issue unresolved.

Why it matters: After all of the fighting over President Trump's decision to end DACA — including a government shutdown over it — the White House and Congress ended up with nothing. The issue is currently tied up in the courts. And though both sides agree it's better to give Dreamers more certainty over their future, they just can't agree how to do it.