Apr 13, 2019

Pence joins Trump in denying return of family separations

Trump signs an executive order on June 20, 2018 to end to the separation of migrant families at the border. Photo: Mandel Ngan/ AFP/Getty Images

Vice President Mike Pence stood by the president's assertions on Friday that the administration does not plan to reinstate its policy of separating migrant families at the border, following an NBC report that 3 U.S. officials said Trump has urged a return of the policy.

The bottom line: Multiple sources told CNN the same thing, and said that Trump also advocated for separating families that entered through legal ports of entry. Whether the administration plans to bring back the policy or not, Trump is embracing increasingly extreme immigration ideas.

What they're saying: "The president made it very clear this week that we're not bringing back family separations," Pence told CNN on Friday, per the Hill.

The numbers that matter: It could take 2 years for federal officials to identify the 47,000 migrant children who were likely separated from their parents before the government began collecting data through its "zero-tolerance" immigration policy in April 2018.

Go deeper: Inside Trump's hardline new border plan

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1 hour ago - World

U.S. sends Brazil 2 million doses of hydroxychloroquine and 1,000 ventilators

President Trump and Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro. Photo: Chris Kleponis-Pool/Getty Images

The White House announced on Sunday that the U.S. has sent 2 million doses of the anti-malarial drug hydroxychloroquine to Brazil, and that 1,000 ventilators will soon be delivered as well as the South American country becomes the new epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic.

The big picture: The situation in Brazil, which has reported over 498,000 cases of COVID-19 and more than 28,000 deaths, is threatening to spiral out of control as far-right President Jair Bolsonaro faces mounting criticism for downplaying the severity of the virus.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

DOJ to treat antifa involvement in protests as domestic terrorism

Barr and Trump. Photo: Doug Mills-Pool/Getty Images

Attorney General Bill Barr said in a statement Sunday that the Justice Department will use its network of 56 regional FBI Joint Terrorism Task Forces to identify the "criminal organizers and instigators" of violence during the George Floyd protests, including antifa and similar groups.

Why it matters: Barr, President Trump and other members of the administration have pinned the blame for riots and looting over the past few days of protests against police brutality on antifa, a loosely defined far-left movement that uses violence and direct-action protest tactics.

Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Journalists get caught in the crosshairs as protests unfold

A man waves a Black Lives Matter flag atop the CNN logo outside the CNN Center during a protest in response to the police killing of George Floyd, Atlanta, Georgia, May 29. Photo: Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Dozens of journalists across the country tweeted videos Saturday night of themselves and their crews getting arrested, being shot at by police with rubber bullets, targeted with tear gas by authorities or assaulted by protesters.

Why it matters: The incidents show how easy it can be for journalists to become entangled in the stories they cover, especially during a time of civil unrest.