Jun 3, 2017

Pence: Congress is "working around the clock" to repeal ACA

Vice President Mike Pence is still an optimist about the Senate's prospects for getting a health care deal. In Iowa this afternoon, he declared that Congress is "working around the clock" to produce a bill to repeal the Affordable Care Act, and called on the Senate to pass a bill this summer. He said Iowa is "facing a health care crisis" under Obamacare, citing the withdrawals of Wellmark and Aetna from the ACA marketplace and the possibility that Medica might pull out, too.

Reality check: The Senate has been on recess, and Republicans are likely to come back on Monday to a less-than-fully-drafted health care plan and a lot of major decisions still to be made. Some Senate Republicans, including Richard Burr and Ron Johnson, have been sounding more skeptical that the Senate will be able to close the deal.

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22 mins ago - Sports

How coronavirus could reshuffle the sports calendar

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The NBA's Board of Governors approved Thursday the league's 22-team plan to resume play at Walt Disney World — a plan that also includes tentative dates for both this season and next.

Why it matters: The league's proposed trip to Disney World not only impacts this season but could have a domino effect that impacts seasons in the future — and could permanently change what time of year the NBA plays its games.

Buffalo police officers suspended after shoving elderly man

Photo: Mike Desmond/WBFO via AP

Two Buffalo police officers were suspended without pay Thursday night after video emerged of them violently shoving a 75-year-old man to the ground while clearing a protest in the wake of George Floyd's killing in the city’s Niagara Square, WBFO reports.

The state of play: Before WBFO’s video of the incident went viral, a Buffalo police spokesman issued a statement that said "one person was injured when he tripped and fell."

As techlash heats up again, here's who's stoking the fire

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

As controversies around online speech rage against a backdrop of racial tension, presidential provocation and a pandemic, a handful of companies, lawmakers and advocacy groups have continued to promote a backlash against Big Tech.

The big picture: Companies like Facebook and Google got a reputational boost at the start of the coronavirus lockdown, but that respite from criticism proved brief. They're now once again walking a minefield of regulatory investigations, public criticism and legislative threats over antitrust concerns, content moderation and privacy concerns.