House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said on CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday it's "appropriate for people to ask" about how faithful Judge Amy Coney Barrett would be to the Constitution, but that her religious beliefs are not relevant.

Why it matters: Some Republicans have accused Democrats of crossing a line by questioning Barrett's religious views. Pelosi and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden, like Barrett, are practicing Catholics.

What she's saying: "It doesn't matter what her faith is, what religion she believes in. What matters is does she believe in the Constitution of the United States," Pelosi said when host Jake Tapper asked if it was appropriate for senators to question Barrett about her Catholic faith.

  • "I think it's appropriate for people to ask her about how faithful she would be to the Constitution of the United States, whatever her faith," Pelosi said. "Does she believe in the precedent on the Supreme Court that has upheld the Affordable Care Act?"

Flashback: When Democrats expressed concern during her confirmation hearing to the 7th District U.S. Court of Appeals and pressed her on her religious beliefs, Barrett replied, "It's never appropriate for a judge to impose that judge’s personal convictions, whether they arise from faith or anywhere else, on the law."

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Senate Democrats on Wednesday blocked a vote on Republicans' $500 billion targeted COVID-19 relief bill, a far less comprehensive package than the $1.8 trillion+ deal currently being negotiated between the Trump administration and House Democrats.

Why it matters: There's little appetite in the Senate for a stimulus bill with a price tag as large as what President Trump and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi have been calling for. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's (R-Ky.) "skinny" proposal was mostly seen as a political maneuver, as it had little chance of making it out of the Senate.

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The Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday advanced the nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court despite a boycott by Democratic senators.

The big picture: The 12 Republicans on the panel voted in favor of advancing the nomination while the committee's 10 Democrats submitted no votes. Democrats instead placed enlarged photos of Affordable Care Act beneficiaries in their seats, drawing attention to the upcoming Supreme Court case on the legislation. A full Senate vote on Barrett's nomination is set for Oct. 26.

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Joe Biden told CBS' "60 Minutes" this week that, if elected, he would put together a bipartisan commission to study the federal court system and make recommendations for reform.

Why it matters: Biden has come under pressure to clarify his position on court packing after some Democrats suggested expanding the court if Senate Republicans confirm President Trump's Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett.