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Michael Kappeler/Pool Photo via AP

Critics pounced when Ivanka Trump briefly sat in for her father at the G20 summit in Hamburg, contending that the president's daughter — particularly one who has said she tries to "stay out of politics" — wasn't the right person to represent the U.S. on the world stage.

But while Ivanka's role has been particularly visible, she was far from the first the first child of a president to join his administration.

  • Presidents Grant, Fillmore, Johnson, Tyler, Van Buren, and Hayes all had sons act as their private secretary while in the White House.
  • President Eisenhower's son John Eisenhower acted as advisor on national security during Eisenhower's second term.
  • President FDR's daughter Anna served as his private assistant, and traveled with him to the World War II Yalta Conference, meeting with Stalin and Churchill.
  • President Theodore Roosevelt's daughter Alice "was dispatched to represent her father on a diplomatic tour of five Asian countries in 1905."
  • President Reagan's daughter Maureen, was named the "special consultant to the Republican National Committee" in 1983, and moved into the White House.
  • President Jefferson's daughter Martha took on First Lady responsibilities.
  • President John Quincy Adams' son John Adams II was appointed minister to Prussia.
  • President Wilson's three daughters Margaret, Jessie and Eleanor reminded their father "again and again how important it was that women be able to vote." Margaret served as hostess of the convention for the group that would later be called the League of Women Voters in 1915, and in 1918 the President "finally began urging House members to vote for the Constitutional amendment."

Go deeper

Coronavirus hospitalizations top 100,000 for the first time

Expand chart
Data: The COVID Tracking ProjectHarvard Global Health Institute; Cartogram: Danielle Alberti and Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

More than 100,000 Americans are now in the hospital with coronavirus infections — a new record, an indication that the pandemic is continuing to get worse and a reminder that the virus is still very dangerous.

Why it matters: Hospitalizations are a way to measure severe illnesses — and severe illnesses are on the rise across the U.S. In some areas, health systems and health care workers are already overwhelmed, and outbreaks are only getting worse.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
13 mins ago - Economy & Business

Our make-believe economy

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The Federal Reserve and global central banks are remaking the world's economy in an effort to save it, but have created something of a monster.

Why it matters: The Fed-driven economy relies on the creation of trillions of dollars — literally out of thin air — that are used to purchase bonds and push money into a pandemic-ravaged economy that has long been dependent on free cash and is only growing more addicted.

New hope for "smart cities"

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

It's time to polish our gleaming vision of urban environments where internet technology makes everything from finding a parking space to measuring air quality a snap.

Why it matters: The Biden administration's Cabinet appointees are likely to be champions of bold futurism in urban planning — which could mean that smart infrastructure projects, like broadband deployment and digital city services, get fresh funding and momentum.

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