Dec 26, 2017

Parts of Puerto Rico could be without power until May

Photo: Getty Images

Jesus M. Montijo, who said his home was destroyed by Hurricane Maria, holds his 1-year-old son, Damian Kaleb, on Christmas in a shelter for hurricane victims in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico.

Go deeper ... The N.Y. Times asks officials why it's taking so long: It was "an already outdated and poorly maintained grid," and "lines went down, poles snapped, towers fell and substations flooded."

  • Around 600 Hurricane Maria victims remain in shelters across Puerto Rico. Barely three months after Hurricane Maria made landfall, 35% of the devastated island is reported to be without electricity.
  • Per Military.com, Brig. Gen. Diana Holland, commander of the Army Corps of Engineers' South Atlantic Division, said last week that figure may be misleading, but admitted: "There is a long way to go."
  • "Holland estimated that 95% of the island could have power by late February or early March but 'the folks at the end of the line in remote areas' might not have electricity until May."

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The top stories from "Axios on HBO"

From last night's episode:

A closer look at how colleges can reopen

The campus of Brown University. Photo: Lane Turner/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Masks in class, sports on hold, dorm life without roommates and summer 2021 classes for some: Brown University President Christina Paxson tells "Axios on HBO" it's all in play as colleges consider whether and how to safely reopen campuses in the fall.

Why it matters: An extended shutdown of U.S. colleges and universities would leave nearly 20 million students and 3 million employees with an uncertain future, but premature reopenings without proper coronavirus safeguards could jeopardize lives and force more closings.

How Disney World could host the NBA

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

After weeks of speculation, the NBA announced Saturday that it is in early discussions to resume its season in late July at Disney's ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex in Orlando.

What they're saying: The NBA's most well-sourced reporter, Adrian Wojnarowski, says "everything is pointing toward" this happening, and that teams could start recalling players as soon as next week for a two-week quarantine period and formal training camp before heading to Florida.