Photo: Getty Images

Jesus M. Montijo, who said his home was destroyed by Hurricane Maria, holds his 1-year-old son, Damian Kaleb, on Christmas in a shelter for hurricane victims in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico.

Go deeper ... The N.Y. Times asks officials why it's taking so long: It was "an already outdated and poorly maintained grid," and "lines went down, poles snapped, towers fell and substations flooded."

  • Around 600 Hurricane Maria victims remain in shelters across Puerto Rico. Barely three months after Hurricane Maria made landfall, 35% of the devastated island is reported to be without electricity.
  • Per Military.com, Brig. Gen. Diana Holland, commander of the Army Corps of Engineers' South Atlantic Division, said last week that figure may be misleading, but admitted: "There is a long way to go."
  • "Holland estimated that 95% of the island could have power by late February or early March but 'the folks at the end of the line in remote areas' might not have electricity until May."

Go deeper

Updated 15 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Chris Christie: Wear a mask "or you may regret it — as I did" — Senate Democrats block vote on McConnell's targeted relief bill.
  2. Economy: Why the stimulus delay isn't a crisis (yet).
  3. Health: The pandemic is getting worse again New York reports most cases since MayMany U.S. coronavirus deaths were avoidable.
  4. Education: Boston and Chicago send students back home for online learning.
  5. World: Spain becomes first nation in Western Europe to exceed 1 million cases — France becomes the second.

Biden says he will appoint commission on Supreme Court reform

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Joe Biden told CBS' "60 Minutes" this week that if elected, he would put together a bipartisan commission to study the federal court system and make recommendations for reform.

Why it matters: Biden has come under pressure to clarify his position on court packing after some Democrats suggested expanding the court if Senate Republicans confirm President Trump's Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
46 mins ago - Economy & Business

Wall Street still prefers bonds

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Sunset Boulevard/Getty Contributor

Investors' return on U.S. corporate bonds has been falling since its August peak, but buying has only accelerated, especially in investment grade bonds that are offering historically low yields.

The state of play: Since hitting its 2020 high on Aug. 4, the benchmark Bloomberg Barclays U.S. bond aggregate has delivered a -2.2% return. (For comparison, the S&P 500 has gained 3.9% during the same time period.)

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