SaveSave story

Father of Parkland victim: "We as a country have failed our children"

Students and parents who have been affected by gun violence from Columbine, Sandy Hook and the latest school shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School, among others, came face-to-face with President Trump on Wednesday giving emotional remarks and offering solutions to gun control in the U.S. at a listening session at the White House.

  • Justin Gruber, student: "I'm only 15 years old...I was born into a world where I never got to experience safety and peace. There needs to be a significant change in this country."
  • Ariana Klein, student: "This is not just Parkland anymore, this is America, this is every student in every city."
  • Father of Parkland student Justin Gruber: "If he's not old enough to buy a beer, he shouldn't be old enough to buy a gun."
  • Andrew Pollack, whose daughter Meadow was killed: "We as a country failed our children...I can't get on a plane with a bottle of water, but some animal could walk into a school and shoot our children."
  • Samuel Zeif, student: "I can't feel comfortable in my country, knowing that people...are ever going to feel like this. I want to feel safe at school."
  • Mayor of Parkland, Florida, Christine Hunschofsky, told President Trump that "we have to at some point care enough and be strong enough to come up with solutions" to gun violence."

Go deeper: Trump on ending gun violence: "We're going to get it done."

Haley Britzky 4 hours ago
SaveSave story

DOJ eyeing tool to allow access to encrypted data on smartphones

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.
Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. Photo: Win McNamee / Getty Images

The Justice Department is in "a preliminary stage" of discussions about requiring tech companies building "tools into smartphones and other devices" that would allow law enforcement investigators to access encrypted data, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: This has been on the FBI's mind since 2010, and last month the White House "circulated a memo...outlining ways to think about solving the problem," officials told the Times. Both FBI Director Christopher Wray, and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, support finding ways for law enforcement to access data without compromising devices security.

Haley Britzky 4 hours ago
SaveSave story

Media tycoon Barry Diller talks #MeToo

 IAC & Expedia, Inc. Chairman & Senior Executive Barry Diller
IAC & Expedia, Inc. Chairman & Senior Executive Barry Diller. Photo: Cindy Ord / Getty Images for Yahoo

Barry Diller, chairman of mega-media and Internet company IAC, told the New York Times he thinks "all men are guilty," when it comes to "the spectrum" of the #MeToo movement.

"I hope in the future for some form of reconciliation. Because I think all men are guilty. I’m not talking about rape and pillage. I’m not talking about Harveyesque. I’m talking about all of the spectrum. From an aggressive flirt. Or even just a flirty-flirt that has one sour note in it. Or what I think every man was guilty of, some form of omission in attitude, in his views."

Why it matters: The #MeToo movement has rocked Hollywood and the media industry. Diller told the Times he sees the effects of this "in our companies, where the relationships between people are changing."