Jan 15, 2020

Democrats seek answers on Iran cyber threats

Photo illustration: Filograph

House Democratic leaders pressed the Trump administration Wednesday on how it is preparing telecom companies for possible cyberattacks from Iran after the killing of Iranian Gen. Qasem Soleimani.

Why it matters: Iranian hackers have been known to attack U.S. businesses, and fears that they could turn their attention to key U.S. infrastructure — including communications networks — spiked following Soleimani's death in an American airstrike.

Driving the news: House Energy & Commerce Committee Chairman Frank Pallone and communications subcommittee chairman Mike Doyle want to know the steps the administration is taking to ensure telecommunications providers are prepared for possible cyber attacks.

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Buttigieg: "No evidence that [killing Soleimani] made our country safer"

Photo: Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images

Sen. Bernie Sanders and Mayor Pete Buttigieg both stated they would have handled the drone strike on Iranian Gen. Qasem Soleimani differently than President Trump.

The big picture: Trump is likely to parade the killing of Soleimani as one of his signature national security accomplishments in the 2020 campaign. ABC News' David Muir pointed out previous administrations knew of Soleimani's threat but never ordered a strike.

FCC says wireless location data sharing broke the law

FCC commissioners testify before Congress in December. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai told lawmakers Friday he intends to propose fines against at least one U.S. wireless carrier for sharing customers' real-time location data with outside parties without the subscribers' knowledge or consent.

Why it matters: The FCC has been investigating for more than a year following revelations that subscriber location data from AT&T, T-Mobile and Sprint made its way to a resale market used by bounty hunters.

Pentagon: 34 U.S. troops suffered brain injuries following Iran attack

The Ain al-Asad U.S. military airbase in Iraq nearly a week after Iran launched a wave of missiles. Photo: Ayman Henna/AFP via Getty Images

During a press conference Friday, Department of Defense spokesperson Jonathan Rath Hoffman announced 34 U.S. troops were diagnosed with traumatic brain injuries following Iran's attack on U.S. bases in Iraq on Jan. 7.

The state of play: Hoffman confirmed 8 of the 34 troops have returned to the U.S., while 16 of the injured were treated in Iraq and have returned to service. Iran's attack came after a U.S. drone strike killed Iranian Gen. Qasem Soleimani.

Go deeper: Trump says "all is well" after Iranian strikes on bases hosting U.S. troops

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