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Adapted from an American Wind Energy Association report; Cartogram: Axios Visuals

Four states now generate at least 30% of their electricity annually from wind, now that Oklahoma and Kansas have joined Iowa and South Dakota on the 2017 list. That's one factoid from the American Wind Energy Association's annual report on the state of the wind power market.

Why it matters: It's a data point that underscores the growth of renewables in U.S. power markets. The chart above shows the penetration of utility-scale wind nationwide.

By the numbers:

  • Overall, wind supplied a record 6.3% of U.S. power last year.
  • The U.S. was home to 13% of the new wind power capacity added globally last year, and is a distant second to China in overall capacity and generation.
  • Total U.S. wind power capacity additions last year were slightly over 7,000 megawatts, which is roughly 9% growth.

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California orders sweeping rollback of open businesses as virus cases surge

Photo: Agustin Paullier/AFP via Getty Images

California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Monday ordered indoor operations for restaurants, wineries, movie theaters and other family entertainment like zoos, museums and card rooms to cease immediately. Bars must also close entirely.

Why it matters: It's the largest statewide rollback of a reopening plan yet, underscoring the severity of the coronavirus outbreak in California.

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U.S. rejects China's claims to territory in South China Sea

Photo: Artyom Ivanov\TASS via Getty Images

The State Department announced Monday that it rejects most of China's territorial claims in the South China Sea, a first from the U.S. as the Trump administration toughens its approach toward Beijing.

Why it matters, via Axios' Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian: This is a significant, if symbolic, step toward a tougher U.S. approach to China's attempted annexation of the open seas.

Los Angeles and San Diego public schools will be online only this fall

Alhambra Unified School District. Photo: Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Public schools in Los Angeles and San Diego, the two largest public school districts in California, will not be sending children back to campuses next month and will instead administer online classes due to concerns over the ongoing threat of the coronavirus.

Why it matters: The two districts, which together enroll about 825,000 students, are the largest in the country thus far to announce that they will not return to in-person learning in the fall, even as the Trump administration aggressively pushes for schools to do so.