Photo: Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images

President Obama first heard Nipsey Hussle's music thanks to his daughters, and though he never met the musician, that didn't stop him from offering his condolences in a letter at Hussle's funeral procession, praising the Grammy-nominated rapper for his work in southern Los Angeles.

Details: Obama's letter was read aloud by hip-hop personality Karen Civil at Hussle's memorial at the Staples Center. The procession spanned 25.5 miles and went through the neighborhoods he had been active in, the New York Times reports.

"While most folks look at the Crenshaw neighborhood where [Hussle] grew up and see only gangs, bullets and despair, Nipsey saw potential. He saw hope. He saw a community that, even though its flaws, taught him to keep going. His choice to invest in that community rather than ignore it."
— President Obama

Background: Hussle — born Ermias Joseph Asghedom — was fatally shot outside of Hussle's clothing store in L.A. last month. The suspected shooter has been charged with murder, reports CNBC. Hussle was also an active member of the Eritrean community,

Other speakers and performers:

  • Lauren London, Hussle's girlfriend and actress
  • Angelique Smith, Hussle's mother
  • Leader of the Nation of Islam Louis Farrakhan
  • Jhené Aiko
  • Stevie Wonder
  • Snoop Dogg
  • Marsha Ambrosias

Go deeper

The pandemic real estate market

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

It's not just emotional buying, real estate agents say: There are smart and strategic reasons that Americans of all ages, races and incomes are moving away from urban centers.

Why it matters: Bidding wars, frantic plays for a big suburban house with a pool, buying a property sight unseen — they're all part of Americans' calculus that our lives and lifestyles have been permanently changed by coronavirus and that we'll need more space (indoors and out) for the long term.

40 mins ago - Health

Coronavirus cases are falling, but don't get too comfortable

Data: The COVID Tracking Project, state health departments; Map: Andrew Witherspoon, Danielle Alberti, Sara Wise/Axios

America's coronavirus outbreak is slowing down after a summer of explosive growth.

By the numbers: The U.S. is averaging roughly 52,000 new cases per day — still a lot of cases, but about 10.5% fewer than it was averaging last week.

41 mins ago - Health

We're doing a lot less coronavirus testing

Data: The COVID Tracking Project; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The U.S. is cutting back on coronavirus testing. Nationally, the number of tests performed each day is about 17% lower than it was at the end of July, and testing is also declining in hard-hit states.

Why it matters: This big reduction in testing has helped clear away delays that undermined the response to the pandemic. But doing fewer tests can also undermine the response to the pandemic.