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Barack Obama delivers his speech during the 4th Congress of Indonesian Diaspora Network in Jakarta, Indonesia this July. Achmad Ibrahim / AP

While speaking at an event sponsored by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation today, former President Barack Obama said "people are alive today because of" the Affordable Care Act, "and when I see people trying to undo that hard-won progress…it is aggravating."

Obama ripped into the Graham-Cassidy bill, which proposes block grant funding to be distributed among the states. Obama said it would "raise costs, reduce coverage and roll back protections for older Americans, and people with pre-existing conditions." Based on current projections from consulting firm Avalere Health, health care cuts could top $4 trillion under this bill.

Other key quotes:

  • "Nationalist thought, xenophobic sentiment ... a politics that threatens to turn good people away from the kind of collective action that has always driven human progress."
  • On climate change: It's the "threat that may define the contours of this century more than any other."
  • On the future of the internet: "I don't think we can count on conventional media to spread the word [of progress]. This is where the power of the internet has not been harnessed the way it needs to be, particularly when you think of young people and young audiences.

Watch Obama speak:

Obama is speaking across town from Trump's UN appearance.

Go deeper

Big Tech's post-riot reckoning

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

The Capitol insurrection means the anti-tech talk in Washington is more likely to lead to action, since it's ever clearer that the attack was planned, at least in part, on social media.

Why it matters: The big platforms may have hoped they'd move to D.C.'s back burner, with the Hill focused on the Biden agenda and the pandemic out of control. But now, there'll be no escaping harsh scrutiny.

9 mins ago - Technology

Why domestic terrorists are so hard to police online

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Domestic terrorism has proven to be more difficult for Big Tech companies to police online than foreign terrorism.

The big picture: That's largely because the politics are harder. There's more unity around the need to go after foreign extremists than domestic ones — and less danger of overreaching and provoking a backlash.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
14 mins ago - Economy & Business

Work-wherever turns to work-whenever

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The pandemic killed the 9-to-5 workday for many.

The big picture: So much of our society — from after-school child care programs to the most coveted time slots for television shows — is structured around working from 9 to 5. But our countrywide experiment in remote work has demonstrated that the hours we are logged on don't matter as long as the work gets done.