Photo: Jaap Arriens / Getty Images

On Tuesday evening, Uber confirmed that Uzbekistan-born Sayfullo Habibullaevic Saipov, who allegedly mowed into bicyclists and pedestrians on a bike path in lower Manhattan, killing eight people, was indeed a driver for its ride-hailing service.

"We are horrified by this senseless act of violence," said an Uber spokesperson. "Our hearts are with the victims and their families. We have reached out to law enforcement to provide our full assistance."

Déjà vu: Similarly to a series of deadly shootings in Kalamazoo, Mich. last year by an Uber driver, the company is finding itself under the spotlight. In both cases, the drivers passed Uber's mandatory background check, which includes driving and criminal records over the past seven years, and had no prior safety reports from passengers that would have alerted Uber. The company has been criticized for years for not following in the footsteps of the taxi industry and mandating fingerprinting, though it argues that its own methods are more thorough.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7 a.m. ET: 30,804,120 — Total deaths: 957,348— Total recoveries: 21,062,785Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7 a.m. ET: 6,766,631 — Total deaths: 199,268 — Total recoveries: 2,577,446 — Total tests: 94,211,463Map.
  3. Education: What we overlooked in the switch to remote learning
  4. Politics: In reversal, CDC again recommends coronavirus testing for asymptomatic people.
  5. Health: The dwindling chances of eliminating COVID-19.
  6. World: Guatemalan president tests positive for COVID-19 — The countries painting their pandemic recoveries green.

What we overlooked in the switch to remote learning

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

America’s rapid and urgent transition to online school has come with a host of unforeseen consequences that are only getting worse as it continues into the fall.

The big picture: The issues range from data privacy to plagiarism, and schools are ill-equipped to deal with them, experts say.

The positions of key GOP senators on replacing Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell talks to reporters on Capitol Hill last Thursday. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

With President Trump planning to nominate his third Supreme Court justice nominee by next week, key Republican senators are indicating their stance on replacing the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg just over six weeks out from Election Day.

The big picture: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) has vowed that "Trump’s nominee will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate." But Sen. Lisa Murkowski (Alaska) told Alaska Public Media, "I would not vote to confirm a Supreme Court nominee. We are 50 some days away from an election."