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Carl Bernstein (second from left) and Bob Woodward (third from left) with Dustin Hoffman and Robert Redford at "All the President's Men" premiere in 1976 / AP

Six weeks ( 44 days) into his presidency, Donald Trump, when left alone because Jared and Ivanka are observing the Sabbath, still bangs out tweets (with episodic misspellings) making wild accusations based on flimsy or nonexistent evidence. And not a single word you just read is disputable. Let that sink in.

Here's why even you Trump fans and White House officials should worry: The weekend tweetstorms have hit the courts, intelligence agencies and the media. One day soon, the president will need the public to trust the very institutions he's trying to discredit.

Joe Scarborough first noticed that many of Trump's wilder tweets (including the "so-called judge") cluster on Saturday mornings. Click here for a jaw-dropping roundup of the Saturday tweets, by Axios' Stef Kight: "Once upon a time, Saturdays were devoid of news beyond the boring presidential radio address. Now, they are wild affairs, featuring Trump Twitter tantrums."

This time, a Trumper tantrum started with Attorney General Sessions' recusal, apparently escalated in a huddle with top aides before the president left for Mar-a-Lago: He went "ballistic," per ABC's Jon Karl and Chris Vlasto. CNN has video, shot through a White House window.

Trump, furious about the cave by Sessions, left Bannon and Priebus back in D.C. And with the adults away, POTUS just had to play.

Subscribe to Axios AM/PM for a daily rundown of what's new and why it matters, directly from Mike Allen.
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Go deeper

38 mins ago - Technology

Scoop: Google won't donate to members of Congress who voted against election results

Sen. Ted Cruz led the group of Republicans who opposed certifying the results. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Google will not make contributions from its political action committee this cycle to any member of Congress who voted against certifying the results of the presidential election, following the deadly Capitol riot.

Why it matters: Several major businesses paused or pulled political donations following the events of Jan. 6, when pro-Trump rioters, riled up by former President Trump, stormed the Capitol on the day it was to certify the election results.

Minority Mitch still setting Senate agenda

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Chuck Schumer may be majority leader, yet in many ways, Mitch McConnell is still running the Senate show — and his counterpart is about done with it.

Why it matters: McConnell rolled over Democrats unapologetically, and kept tight control over his fellow Republicans, while in the majority. But he's showing equal skill as minority leader, using political jiujitsu to convert a perceived weakness into strength.