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Harvard Business School. Photo: Brooks Kraft LLC/Corbis via Getty Images

TechCrunch found that CEOs of U.S. companies —  funded in the last three years, and have raised "at least $100 million in total venture financing" — are relatively diverse in where they were educated.

The details: The two top schools were Harvard and Stanford with 24 total alumni who became CEOs of heavily funded startups. But also on the list were universities like University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, University of Michigan, University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada.

Some of the most successful companies' CEOs have gone to a mix of schools:

  • Airbnb's CEO Brian Chesky went to the Rhode Island School of Design.
  • WeWork's CEO Adam Neumann attended Baruch College of the City University of New York (CUNY.)
    • Neumann also just finished his degree last year, TechCrunch reports, "15 years after he started."
  • Rony Abovitz, the CEO of Magic Leap, a startup working on an augmented-reality headset, went to University of Miami.

The bottom line: While not every successful CEO went to an Ivy League school or graduated college, those educations are still extremely prevalent.

Go deeper

Tech digs in for long domestic terror fight

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

With domestic extremist networks scrambling to regroup online, experts fear the next attack could come from a radicalized individual — much harder than coordinated mass events for law enforcement and platforms to detect or deter.

The big picture: Companies like Facebook and Twitter stepped up enforcement and their conversations with law enforcement ahead of Inauguration Day. But they'll be tested as the threat rises that impatient lone-wolf attackers will lash out.

The pandemic could be worsening childhood obesity

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The 10-month long school closures and the coronavirus pandemic are expected to have a big impact on childhood obesity rates.

Why it matters: About one in five children are obese in the U.S. — an all-time high — with worsening obesity rates across income and racial and ethnic groups, data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey show.

Dave Lawler, author of World
1 hour ago - World

Biden's Russia challenge

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The Biden administration has already proposed a five-year extension of the last treaty constraining the U.S. and Russian nuclear arsenals, announced an urgent investigation into a massive Russia-linked cyberattack, and demanded the release of Russia’s leading opposition figure, Alexey Navalny.

Why it matters: Those three steps in Biden's first week underscore the challenge he faces from Vladimir Putin — an authoritarian intent on weakening the U.S. and its alliances, with whom he’ll nonetheless have to engage on critical issues.

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