Feb 22, 2018

North Korean general suspected of plotting deadly attacks to attend Olympics

General Kim Yong-chol. Photo by JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images

North Korea will send its head of national intelligence, General Kim Yong-chol, to the closing ceremony of the Winter Olympics, reports BBC News. Kim is the former head of North Korea's spy agency, which was accused of carrying out attacks that killed scores of South Koreans under his leadership.

Why it matters: There has been a remarkable thawing of relations between the two countries on display at the Olympics, but the U.S. has been wary of engaging in such diplomacy without signals Pyongyang will roll back its nuclear and missile programs. Ivanka Trump will lead the U.S. delegation, but officials say there is no formal meeting planned between her and the North Korean party.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 6,299,759 — Total deaths: 376,177 — Total recoveries — 2,714,972Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 1,811,277 — Total deaths: 105,147 — Total recoveries: 458,231 — Total tested: 17,340,682Map.
  3. Public health: Protests against police brutality threaten coronavirus response.
  4. Business: Coronavirus could lower GDP by $15.7 trillion — More than 1 in 6 black workers lost jobs between February and April.
  5. Federal government: Trump lashes out at governors, calls for National Guard to "dominate" streets.
  6. Media: Interest in the George Floyd protests has soared past the coronavirus

More than 1 in 6 black workers lost jobs between February and April

Adapted from EPI analysis of Bureau of Labor Statistics data; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

As is often the case, the staggering job losses in the coronavirus-driven recession have been worse for black workers.

By the numbers: According to a report from the Economic Policy Institute, titled "Racism and economic inequality have predisposed black workers to be most hurt by coronavirus pandemic," more than 1 in 6 black workers lost their jobs between February and April.

Coronavirus could lower GDP by $15.7 trillion

Reproduced from Congressional Budget Office; Chart: Axios Visuals

The CBO released projections on Monday for U.S. nominal GDP to be lower by $15.7 trillion over the next decade than its estimate in January as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

What they're saying: It predicts that when adjusted for inflation GDP will be $7.9 trillion lower over the next decade and down by $790 billion in the second quarter of this year — a 37.7% quarterly contraction.