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North Korean leader Kim Jong Un waves at parade participants at the Kim Il Sung Square. Photo: Wong Maye-E / AP

America's North Korea envoy, Joseph Yun, has been warning lawmakers that North Korea has been avoiding talks with the U.S. in response to Trump's attacks on Kim Jong-un, NBC reports, citing "multiple U.S. government and congressional officials." This comes after Tillerson said in Beijing that the U.S. has "three" channels open to North Korea.

Impact: Yun's warnings inspired Senator Bob Corker's comments that the administration is fraying diplomatic efforts, per these sources. East Asian and Pacific Affairs Bureau Spokesperson Justin Higgins for his own part said that although "we still want to see a peaceful, diplomatic solution to the North Korean nuclear and missile threat, now is clearly not the time for talks."

The State Department's take: Higgins said, "We can't comment on allegations from anonymous sources," adding that "The DPRK's belligerent and provocative behavior demonstrates it has no interest in working toward a peaceful solution."

Up next: Yun is working on restarting talks between a top diplomat and North Korea and could include Secretary of State Rex Tillerson. Yun is also working on toning down the rhetoric coming from the administration. Trump is traveling to the region next month, although he may not visit the Demilitarized Zone between North and South Korea.

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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Large coronavirus outbreaks leading to high death rates — Coronavirus cases are at an all-time high ahead of Election Day — U.S. tops 88,000 COVID-19 cases, setting new single-day record.
  2. Politics: States beg for Warp Speed billions.
  3. World: Taiwan reaches a record 200 days with no local coronavirus cases.
  4. 🎧Podcast: The vaccine race turns toward nationalism.
22 mins ago - Health

States beg for Warp Speed billions

A COVID-19 drive-thru testing center yesterday at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens. Photo: David Santiago/Miami Herald via AP

Operation Warp Speed has an Achilles' heel: States need billions to distribute vaccines — and many say they don't have the cash.

Why it matters: The first emergency use authorization could come as soon as next month, but vaccines require funding for workers, shipping and handling, and for reserving spaces for vaccination sites.

Court rules Minnesota absentee ballots must be received by 8 p.m. Election Day

An election judge drops a ballot in a ballot box at a drive through drop-off for absentee ballots in Minneapolis. Photo: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

An appeals court on Thursday ruled that Minnesota absentee ballots must be received by 8 p.m. on Election Day to be counted.

Why it matters: The ruling, which comes just five days before the election, blocks the state's plan to count absentee ballots arriving late so long as they're postmarked by Nov. 3 and delivered within a week of the election. Now those ballots must be set aside and marked late.