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North Korea cybercrime group targeting Turkish financial sector

Kim Jong-un.
Kim Jong-un. Photo: AFP / Getty Images

Hidden Cobra, a North Korean cybercrime group, is suspected of launching a malware attack on Turkey’s financial system, according to the McAfee Advanced Threat Research team. The attack shows similarities to the attack on the global financial network, SWIFT, according to code analysis.

Why it matters: The attacks show a continued interest by North Korea in cyber attacks for financial game, such as the WannaCry attack and one on cryptocurrency exchanges.

The attack:

  • The first hack is believed to have targeted a government-controlled financial institution through malware called Bankshot.
  • Then the hack appeared in a government institution involved in finance and trade.
  • Then it reportedly hit three other financial institutions.

Up next: "This campaign suggests the attackers may plan a future heist against these targets by using Bankshot to gather information," per McAfee.

Go deeper: How cryptocurrencies are being used to evade sanctionsTop cyber powers in the world

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Zuckerberg admits Facebook "breach of trust"

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg walks wearing a t-shirt, with trees behind him
Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Mark Zuckerberg weighed in on what he called the "Cambridge Analytica situation" today in a Facebook post, saying there was a "a breach of trust between Facebook and the people who share their data with us and expect us to protect it. We need to fix that."

Why it matters: Facebook has been under extraordinary pressure from lawmakers, regulators and Wall Street to respond to the issue.

Haley Britzky 4 hours ago
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Authorities find "confession" from Austin bombing suspect

Police and FBI Agents investigate at the Sunset Valley FedEx store in Austin, Texas, which is linked to the package bomb.
Police and FBI Agents investigate at the Sunset Valley FedEx store in Austin, Texas, which is linked to the package bomb. Photo: Suzanne Cordeiro / AFP / Getty Images

Brian Manley, interim police chief in Austin, Texas, said on Wednesday that authorities found "a 25-minute 'confession'" on Mark Conditt's phone, the Austin bombing suspect, per the Washington Post.

The details: Per Manley, Conditt did not mention terrorism or hatred as his motivation; the phone recording seemed to be "the outcry of a very challenged young man, talking about challenges in his personal life, that led him to this point." Conditt also mentioned all known explosive devices, per the Post.