Seth Wenig / AP

The Department of Homeland Security has decided that there will not be a ban on laptops and other electronics in the cabins of flights traveling from Europe to the United States, per Politico.

The concern: The U.S. had received credible intelligence that ISIS might be attempting to convert laptops into bombs — which was reportedly shared by President Trump with Russian officials in the Oval Office. European officials thought storing such devices in the cargo hold might pose more of a risk than terrorism, as electronics with lithium batteries are known to catch fire.

Subject to change: DHS said in a statement that the ban was "still on the table."

"Secretary Kelly affirmed he will implement any and all measures necessary to secure commercial aircraft flying to the United States – including prohibiting large electronic devices from the passenger cabin – if the intelligence and threat level warrant it."

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Pandemic plunges U.K. into "largest recession on record"

The scene near the Royal Exchange and the Bank of England in the City of London, England. Photo: Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images

The United Kingdom slumped into recession as its gross domestic product GDP shrank 20.4% compared with the first three months of the year, the Office of National Statistics (ONS) confirmed Wednesday.

Why it matters: Per an ONS statement, "It is clear that the U.K. is in the largest recession on record." The U.K. has faired worse than any other major European economy from coronavirus lockdowns, Bloomberg notes. And finance minister Rishi Sunak warns the situation is likely to worsen.