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A wireless tower housing 5G small cell technology in the front yard of a home in Brookhaven, Georgia. Photo: Screen shot from Axios video

The not-in-my-backyard battles may soon have a new target: 5G small cells.

Where it stands: When it comes to 5G small cell acceptance, a PwC survey of 800 consumers suggests most people are willing to deal with unsightly 5G antennas, especially if they are in someone else's backyard.

By the numbers: 86% said they will accept small cells that "blend into their surroundings."

  • 73% will accept small cells that don't blend in as long as they are not directly in front of their homes.
  • 60% don't care about aesthetics if they can have faster internet service.
"It's one thing to see the installation of the 5G boxes on poles on a main corridor that doesn't offend people. But if you're in a heavily residential area and you're not expecting to see that type of thing, it's almost like having a power transformer in your front yard. People are not going to like those."
— Christian Sigman, city manager of Brookhaven, Georgia

Still, consumers are excited about 5G — and willing to pay more for it — even though they don’t really know what it is, according to a recent Morning Consult poll of 5,600 adults in the U.S. and EU commissioned by IBM.

  • 49% of consumers are very or somewhat excited about 5G, but only 36% said they were even somewhat familiar with the technology.
  • 49% of U.S. consumers said they would be willing to pay more for 5G, but only 4% said they would pay “significantly” more.
  • 38% said they understand the differences between 5G and 4G, but only 7% said they understand the differences “very well.”

Between the lines: There has been a lot of hype about the promise of 5G, but consumers are still struggling with the specifics ahead of widespread rollout — and NIMBY backlash may slow down small cell construction in neighborhoods.

Go deeper: 5G will see a wide rollout in 2020

Go deeper

The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.

Rep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19

Lou Correa. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) announced on Saturday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Correa is the latest Democratic lawmaker to share his positive test results after last week's deadly Capitol riot. Correa did not shelter in the designated safe zone with his congressional colleagues during the siege, per a spokesperson, instead staying outside to help Capitol Police.

Far-right figure "Baked Alaska" arrested for involvement in Capitol siege

Photo: Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The FBI arrested far-right media figure Tim Gionet, known as "Baked Alaska," on Saturday for his involvement in last week's Capitol riot, according to a statement of facts filed in the U.S. District Court in the District of Columbia.

The state of play: Gionet was arrested in Houston on charges related to disorderly or disruptive conduct on the Capitol grounds or in any of the Capitol buildings with the intent to impede, disrupt, or disturb the orderly conduct of a session, per AP.