Photo: Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images

In Game 3 of the Western Conference Finals, San Jose's Erik Karlsson scored the game-winner in overtime to give the Sharks a 5-4 win and a 2-1 series lead over the St. Louis Blues.

The controversy: The assist from Timo Meier that led to Karlsson's goal appeared to have been an illegal hand pass. All four referees missed it, marking another blown call in a postseason filled with them.

  • And, since the NHL's video review process doesn't include hand passes that lead to goals, the play was not able to be reviewed.
  • NHL official statement: "Plays of this nature are not reviewable. A hand pass that goes into the net can be reviewed, but a hand pass between teammates cannot be reviewed."

My take: I understand certain plays not being reviewable. It slows the game down and can make for a slippery slope. That being said, once the postseason begins, everything (within reason) needs to be reviewable. Period.

  • The world is watching. The goal should be to get the call right, regardless of how long that takes or what transpired on the play in question. Why hasn't every league adopted this policy?
  • And by the way, I'm not even 100% sure that replay would have overturned the goal. I think it would have, but who cares what I think? This is precisely why we have replay review! To find these things out for certain!

Watch: According to NHL rules, a player can't bat the puck with his hand to a teammate, or "[allow] his team to gain an advantage" with a hand pass.

Go deeper: The biggest earners left in the NBA and NHL playoffs

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Misinformation thrives on social media ahead of presidential debate

Joe Biden speaking in Wilmington, Delaware, on Sept. 27. Photo: Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

A baseless conspiracy theory that Joe Biden would wear an electronic device in his ear during the first presidential debate on Tuesday went viral on social media hours before the event.

Why it matters: The conspiracy originated on social media before appearing in a text message sent by President Trump’s re-election campaign to supporters. It was then regurgitated by media outlets like Fox News and New York Post, who cited the Trump campaign, throughout the day, according to NBC News.

Amy Coney Barrett says Trump offered her nomination 3 days after Ginsburg's death

Barrett speaks after being nominated to the US Supreme Court by President Trump in the Rose Garden of the White House. Photo:; Olivier Douliery/AFP

Amy Coney Barrett said in a questionnaire released by the Senate Judiciary Committee Tuesday that President Trump offered her the Supreme Court nomination on Sept. 21, five days before he announced the pick to the public.

Why it matters: According to the questionnaire, Trump offered Barrett the nomination just three days after Ruth Bader Ginsburg died, suggesting that the president knew early on that Barrett was his pick. Minutes after offering Barrett the nomination, however, Trump told reporters that he had not made up his mind and that five women were on the shortlist.

Appeals court upholds six-day extension for counting Wisconsin ballots

Photo: Derek R. Henkle/AFP via Getty Images

A federal appeals court on Tuesday upheld a lower court ruling that extended the deadline for counting mail-in ballots in Wisconsin until Nov. 9 as long as they are postmarked by the Nov. 3 election, AP reports.

Why it matters: It's a big win for Democrats that also means that the winner of Wisconsin, a key presidential swing state, may not be known for six days after the election. Republicans are likely to appeal the ruling to the Supreme Court, as the Pennsylvania GOP did after a similar ruling on Monday.

Go deeper: How the Supreme Court could decide the election