Jul 17, 2020

Axios PM

By Mike Allen
Mike Allen

Good afternoon: Today's PM — edited by Justin Green — is 483 words, a 2-minute read.

⚡️A federal judge ordered DACA, the Obama-era program for young undocumented immigrants, restored to its full status following the Supreme Court's decision that the Trump administration violated federal law when it ended the program.

1 big thing: Virus threatens food programs

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Kids will already suffer this fall if they can't return to classrooms, and for millions of them it also threatens their access to nutritious food.

  • Why it matters: School is not just a place for learning; it's also a place where children get fed. Millions of children who don't go to school on any given day risk going hungry at home, Axios' Felix Salmon reports.

The big picture: 13.9 million children are suffering from food insecurity, up from 2.5 million in 2018 and 5.1 million at the height of the Great Recession in 2008, according to Lauren Bauer of the Hamilton Project, who used data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

  • "About 3 in 10 Black households with children and 1 in 4 Hispanic households with children did not have sufficient food due to a lack of resources in June," she writes.

Between the lines: School districts rushed to create temporary food solutions for kids when they closed this spring.

  • But many of those districts now face budget crunches and other issues — and kids are bound to fall through the cracks.

Among the broad consequences in terms of academic performance, food-insecure children are more likely to have to repeat a grade and have lower test scores than their food-secure counterparts.

  • A Canadian study found that "child hunger is a significant and independent predictor of youth dropping out of high school, even when multiple effects within the poverty pathway are considered."

The bottom line: The effects of childhood hunger last beyond graduation and well into the workforce.

  • What's next: Former VP Joe Biden called on President Trump and Congress to pass a $30 billion emergency package for public schools.
2. Pic du jour

Photo: Chris Jackson/Getty Images

Queen Elizabeth II knighted Capt. Sir Tom Moore, 100, who raised more than $40 million for charities supporting the U.K.'s National Health Service earlier this year.

  • Buckingham Palace believes this is the first time the ceremony has been performed in a socially distanced format, per the BBC.
3. Catch up quick
  1. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg announced a recurrence of her liver cancer, but said she remains "fully able" to fulfill her duties on the court. Go deeper.
  2. The Pentagon effectively banned the display of the Confederate flag on military installations. Go deeper.
  3. 3M announced it has investigated over 4,000 reports and filed 18 lawsuits in response to suspected price gouging, counterfeiting and fraud regarding the sale of N95 respirator masks. Go deeper.
  4. Progressive challenger Jamaal Bowman defeated House Foreign Affairs Chair Eliot Engel in New York's 16th congressional district's Democratic primary, which took place on June 23, AP reports.
  5. An alliance of the world's biggest advertising companies — including a few Big Tech firms — has agreed collectively to decide how to better define hate speech across the entire industry. Go deeper.
  6. 🎧 Savannah's mayor on the Georgia face mask fight. Listen here.
4. 1 relatable thing
Photo: Getty Images/Stock

The summer of shortages: Many Americans are rediscovering their backyards and lawns this summer and finding that help is hard to hire — and new stuff is hard to buy, including...

  • Above-ground pools
  • Adirondack chairs
  • Parts and supplies for lighting, pumps and custom pieces (courtesy of China)
  • Treated lumber for fences and decks
  • Time itself: People are finding that landscaping and outdoor remodeling crews are booked for what feels like forever.

The bottom line: There are bigger problems in the world, but in this time of limbo, even the small stuff can sting.

Mike Allen