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Flowers are placed as the FBI inspects the perimeters of Mandalay Bay Hotel after the attack in Las Vegas. Photo: Bilgin Sasmaz / Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

Stephen Paddock, the man who killed 58 people at a Las Vegas country concert and wounded hundreds more, took "many methodical steps to avoid detection," according to the FBI as reported by the New York Times.

Why it matters: His motive is still unclear, but the unsealing of FBI search warrants on Friday reveal more details of their investigation including how Paddock got his weapons and the FBI's focus on his girlfriend.

  • Per the search warrants, Paddock had three phones in his hotel room at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino. One of them was locked, and an FBI agent said "any information related to a potential conspiracy" would be found on the locked phone, the NYT reports.
  • The unsealed documents also reveal the FBI's focus on Paddock's girlfriend, Marilou Danley. She has worked with investigators and repeatedly said she was not involved in Paddock's plan, and did not know of his intentions.
  • Per the Times, investigators wrote in the affidavit that Danley made her Facebook account private a little over two hours after the shooting began, and then deleted the account all together a couple of hours after that.
  • The FBI sought access to Danley's email account, and requested information regarding "several Instagram accounts" believed to have connection to Danley.
  • Paddock "relied on the internet to buy many of the items used in the attack," the NYT reports, including guns and ammo. The court documents suggest that Paddock purchased a "holographic weapon sight" used in the shooting from Amazon.
  • The FBI found "hundreds of rounds of spent ammunition" in his hotel room, along with "body armor, range finders, and a homemade gas mask," per the Times.
  • Paddock also was corresponding with an email account about the weapons he used in the attack, which may have belonged to him. An FBI agent wrote that obtaining a search warrant for one of the email accounts would shed light on Paddock's plan, as it could have been in control of another person, the NYT reports.
  • It was also revealed that Paddock was possibly treated for "unidentified medical conditions."

Go deeper

Justice Department drops insider trading inquiry against Sen. Richard Burr

Sen. Richard Burr (R-N.C.) walking through the Senate Subway in the U.S. Capitol in December 2020. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

The Department of Justice told Sen. Richard Burr (R-N.C.) on Tuesday that it will not move forward with insider trading charges against him.

Why it matters: The decision, first reported by the New York Times, effectively ends the DOJ's investigation into the senator's stock sell-off that occurred after multiple lawmakers were briefed about the coronavirus' potential economic toll. Burr subsequently stepped down as chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee.

Netflix tops 200 million global subscribers

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

Netflix said that it added another 8.5 million global subscribers last quarter, bringing its total number of paid subscribers globally to more than 200 million.

The big picture: Positive fourth-quarter results show Netflix's resiliency, despite increased competition and pandemic-related production headwinds.

Janet Yellen plays down debt, tax hike concerns in confirmation hearing

Treasury Secretary nominee Janet Yellen at an event in December. Photo: Alex Wong via Getty Images

Janet Yellen, Biden's pick to lead the Treasury Department, pushed back against two key concerns from Republican senators at her confirmation hearing on Tuesday: the country's debt and the incoming administration's plans to eventually raise taxes.

Driving the news: Yellen — who's expected to win confirmation — said spending big now will prevent the U.S. from having to dig out of a deeper hole later. She also said the Biden administration's priority right now is coronavirus relief, not raising taxes.