Former New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman. Photo: Spencer Platt via Getty Images

Former New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, who resigned in May after four women accused him of physically abusing them, will not face criminal charges, the New York Times reports.

The details: The prosecutor investigating Schneiderman said that while his accusers were credible, statutes of limitations and other legal barriers would make it difficult to bring charges. Schneiderman issued a statement Thursday saying that he accepts responsibility for his inappropriate conduct and that he is "committed to a lifelong path of recovery and making amends" to those who he harmed.

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57 mins ago - World

U.S.-Israeli delegation secretly visits Sudan

Photo: Artur Widak/NurPhoto via Getty Images

A joint U.S.-Israeli delegation traveled secretly on Wednesday to Sudan for talks on a possible announcement on "ending the state of belligerence" between the countries that could be released in the next few days, sources briefed on the trip told me.

The big picture: President Trump announced earlier this week he is ready to remove Sudan from the U.S. state sponsors of terrorism list once Sudan pays $335 million in compensation to American terror victims.

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
2 hours ago - Economy & Business

A white-collar crime crackdown

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

America has waited a decade for an aggressive government crackdown on white-collar crime. Now, just before the election, and in the middle of a bull market, it has arrived.

Why it matters: When times are good, investors become more trusting and more greedy. That makes them more likely to put their money into fraudulent or criminal enterprises.

  • After a decade-long bull market, there is no shortage of those frauds to prosecute.
2 hours ago - Technology

Lawyers crystal-ball the Google antitrust case

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The Justice Department's antitrust suit against Google is a strong, straightforward monopoly case, competition lawyers and experts tell Axios. But that doesn't mean it'll be an easy journey for the government.

The big picture: Winning any antitrust case is a heavy lift. It's even more of a challenge to pull off victory in a future-looking case that seeks to make room for potential new competition to flourish.