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A U.S. Postal Service employee sorts mail at a distribution box Sept. 26 in New York City. Photo: Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

The New York City Board of Elections issued an alert Monday night after voters complained they received mail-in ballots for November's election containing incorrect names, voter IDs and return labels.

Why it matters: Votes risk being voided if the names and required signatures do not match.

  • "Normally, the voter inserts their completed ballot into the envelope and signs the outside," Gothamist notes. "But in these cases, their ballot envelopes bear the wrong name and address. If a person signs their own name to this faulty ballot envelope, the ballot would be voided."

Driving the news: Multiple voters in Brooklyn told Gothamist that mislabeled "official absentee ballot" envelopes had been sent to them. The New York Post reports some voters in Queens had received misprinted military ballots.

  • City Council member Jimmy Van Bramer told the Post, "There's just mass confusion about these ballots and what people are supposed to do with them. People were already not trusting this process and they were already not trusting the Board of Elections to count the ballot right."

What they're saying: A Board of Election spokesperson told News 4 the source of the error could be attributed to "a vendor hired to print and distribute ballots to voters in Queens and Brooklyn," and pledged to fix the problem for voters in time for the election.

  • "We are determining how many voters have been affected but we can assure that the vendor will address this problem in future mailings, and make sure people who received erroneous envelopes receive new ones," the spokesperson said.
  • Many New Yorkers posted on Twitter about the ballot mishaps they had encountered:

Go deeper

How racial politics still suppress the vote

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photos: Jeremy Hogan (SOPA Image), Noam Galai (WireImage)/Getty Images

Laws restricting voting are less overt than in the days of segregation. But many impediments — some subtle, some blatant — remain for Americans of color.

The big picture: That's changing at this very moment — slowly, and very unevenly.

Why minority voter participation matters

Reproduced from the Pew Research Center; Chart: Axios Visuals

Legal barriers have contributed to limiting voter turnout among people of color. But if people of color voted at the rate of white voters, it would immediately alter who gets elected and what policies they pursue.

Why it matters: In the 2018 midterm elections, all major racial and ethnic groups saw a double-digit increase in their voter participation compared to the 2014 midterms, per the Pew Research Center.

2 hours ago - Podcasts

Former Georgia Gov. Roy Barnes on the Senate runoffs

The future of U.S. politics, and all that flows from it, is in the hands of Georgia voters when they vote in two Senate runoffs on January 5.

Axios Re:Cap digs into the election dynamics with former Georgia Gov. Roy Barnes, a Democrat who served between 1999 and 2003.