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Photo: Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images

New York City restaurants are opening or have already opened auxiliary establishments on Long Island's East End as they look for new ways to reach customers during the coronavirus pandemic, The Wall Street Journal reports.

Why it matters: Restaurant owners in New York City have long been establishing outposts in the Hamptons to reach the summer crowds, per the Journal, but that system is now giving them a lifeline during the pandemic — especially since New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo decided to push back the date to allow indoor dining in New York City's five boroughs.

Yes, but: Summer started in mid-March this year for restaurants after the coronavirus essentially paralyzed New York City.

  • Arlene Spiegel, a New York-based hospitality consultant, told the Journal there is now a "gold rush" of restaurants trying to make it to the East End. Many have been able to get up and running in just weeks.

Go deeper: How the coronavirus will change dining out

Go deeper

Amy Harder, author of Generate
Oct 5, 2020 - Economy & Business
Column / Harder Line

In a pandemic winter, dinner comes with a side of propane

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Americans' plans to socialize outside in colder weather — when COVID-19 will still be a threat to indoor gatherings — are prompting an expensive and environmentally questionable rush on outdoor heaters.

Why it matters: Heating outdoor patios is a big new cost for businesses, and the energy sources are almost always fossil fuels that contribute to climate change.

Updated Nov 9, 2020 - Health

23 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week

Data: Compiled by Axios; Map: Danielle Alberti/Axios

23 states set new highs last week for coronavirus infections recorded in a single day, according to the COVID Tracking Project (CTP) and state health departments. 15 states surpassed records from the previous week.

Why it matters: More states across the country are handling record-high caseloads than this summer.

Woman who allegedly stole laptop from Pelosi's office to sell to Russia is arrested

Photo: FBI

A woman accused of breaching the Capitol and planning to sell to Russia a laptop or hard drive she allegedly stole from Speaker Nancy Pelosi's office was arrested in Pennsylvania's Middle District Monday, the Department of Justice said.

Driving the news: Riley June Williams, 22, is charged with illegally entering the Capitol as well as violent entry and disorderly conduct. She has not been charged over the laptop allegation and the case remains under investigation, per the DOJ.