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New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio speaking in the city in August. Photo: Noam Galai/Getty Images

More than 150 executives at major firms based in New York City asked Mayor Bill de Blasio in a letter on Thursday to resolve "public safety" and "quality of life" issues set off by the coronavirus pandemic.

Why it matters: The companies, including Goldman Sachs, Bank of America, Vornado Realty Trust and JetBlue, warned the mayor that deteriorating conditions across industries and all five boroughs are preventing the city's full economic recovery.

Why it matters via Axios' Jennifer Kingson: New York City is a success story in beating back COVID-19, but many of its wealthiest and most successful residents have fled, some of them never to return.

What they're saying: "Despite New York’s success in containing the coronavirus, unprecedented numbers of New Yorkers are unemployed, facing homelessness, or otherwise at risk," the letter from business leaders read.

  • "There is widespread anxiety over public safety, cleanliness and other quality of life issues that are contributing to deteriorating conditions in commercial districts and neighborhoods across the five boroughs."
  • "We urge you to take immediate action to restore essential services as a necessary precursor for solving the city’s longer term, complex, economic challenges."

The other side: "We’re grateful for our business community and are partnering to rebuild a fairer, better city," de Blasio said on Twitter.

  • "Let’s be clear: To restore city services and save jobs, we need long term borrowing and a federal stimulus — we need these leaders to join the fight to move the City forward."

Go deeper

The urban bathroom shortage worsens

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

With libraries, public parks, and other municipal facilities shutting their restrooms because of COVID-19 — and many retail stores doing the same — there's increasingly no place to "go" for people walking about town.

Why it matters: As inconvenient as the toilet shortage may be for the average person, it's much, much worse for homeless people, not to mention delivery workers, mail carriers and taxi and ride-hail drivers.

Dec 18, 2020 - World

Mexico City bans nonessential activities as COVID-19 cases overwhelm hospitals

Relatives of patients hospitalized in the General Hospital of Zone 1 of the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS) wait outside for updates. Photo: Alfredo Estrella/AFP via Getty Images

Mexico City and the neighboring State of Mexico will ban nonessential activities in an effort to curb a spike in COVID-19 cases that has overwhelmed hospitals, officials announced Friday.

Driving the news: Mexico City Mayor Claudia Sheinbaum said hospital capacity is at about 75%, but the federal government put the number at 80%, per AP. Families have reported searching for hours to find open hospital beds in the capital.

51 mins ago - World

Putin foe Navalny to be detained for 30 days after returning to Moscow

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny. Photo: Oleg Nikishin/Epsilon/Getty Images

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny has been ordered to remain in pre-trial detention for 30 days, following his arrest upon returning to Russia on Sunday for the first time since a failed assassination attempt last year.

Why it matters: The detention of Navalny, an anti-corruption activist and the most prominent domestic critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin, has already set off a chorus of condemnations from leaders in Europe and the U.S.