Apr 11, 2017

New problems for a behavioral health chain

Seth Wenig / AP

Rosalind Adams of Buzzfeed has published her latest feature on Universal Health Services, the for-profit chain of psychiatric and acute-care hospitals, depicting a culture of violence, neglect and "mass chaos" at a UHS-owned behavioral health facility that mostly treats children in Oklahoma. The report also unearthed videos that show raw footage of potentially abusive restraint and a child being thrown into seclusion.

Why this matters: It's another massive blow to the country's largest operator of behavioral health facilities and could spur public and investor pressure. Buzzfeed's initial investigation into UHS from December, which drove the company's stock down by 12%, detailed the pressure to fill beds. The company — led by Alan Miller, the richest CEO in the hospital industry — has defended its care and practices.

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Premier League players launch fund to help U.K. medical workers

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Premier League players have launched an initiative called #PlayersTogether, which will funnel part of their salaries to the National Health Service to support the U.K.'s front-line workers during the coronavirus crisis.

Why it matters: This decision came at the conclusion of a protracted argument between players, clubs and even government officials over who should bear the brunt of lost revenue in the midst of the pandemic.

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GOP sees more hurdles for Trump as coronavirus crisis drags on

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Pandemic forces startups to shift gears

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Spaces CEO Brad Herman had an early warning about COVID-19 because his startup supplies VR attractions to a number of theme parks in China. Realizing that the business he spent the last few years building was going to evaporate, Herman quickly found a new way to apply his team's know-how: helping companies host Zoom teleconferences in VR.

Why it matters: Many startups are rethinking the viability of their core businesses in the wake of the coronavirus. Spaces' move is one of many such pivots likely to crop up in the coming months.