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Voters at the Clark County Election Department on June 9, 2020. Photo: Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Gov. Steve Sisolak (D) signed a law Friday that would give Nevada the first presidential primary in 2024, bouncing New Hampshire and Iowa from being the first stops in the presidential nomination process, according to the Associated Press.

Why it matters: The law, which still needs to be approved by the national political parties, will likely trigger a cascade of other states to scramble to move up their state's contests to be earlier in the process, or to retain their early status.

Background: Democrats in Nevada, led by former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, began pushing for the change following the 2020 election, when they believed the Democratic caucuses in Iowa, marred by technology errors and glitches, led some voters to question the voting process.

  • Advocates of the new law also say that Nevada is more representative of the American electorate than Iowa and New Hampshire.
  • The law would make Nevada a government-run primary election rather than a state-run caucus meeting, per AP.

What they're saying: “Nevada represents a diverse constituency that presidential candidates need to talk to," Jason Frierson, the Nevada speaker of the house who pushed for the change, said Friday at a bill signing ceremony in Las Vegas, per AP.

  • "It is not just for us. It is for candidates to vet their issues and communicate with the kind of communities that they’re going to be asking to vote for them in the national presidential election," Frierson said.

The big picture: The Democratic National Committee has not yet started writing rules for its nominating process, and likely will not until next year, per AP.

  • Republicans in four states that are early in the presidential nominating process jointly opposed Nevada's push, saying they support "protecting the presidential nominating schedule as it has existed for many years," according to AP.

Go deeper

Study: Cost of carbon emissions measured in lives lost is high

Data: Our World in Data; Chart: Axios Visuals

Adding projected heat-related deaths into cost-benefit analysis of federal rules would tilt policymaking in favor of more aggressive carbon emissions cuts, a new study finds.

Why it matters: The social cost of carbon helps determine the outcome of cost-benefit analyses that underpin federal regulations. Adding in global warming's potential to cause more heat-related fatalities would tilt the policy calculus from supporting a gradual phaseout of emissions starting in 2050, to fully decarbonizing by the same year.

Updated 1 hour ago - Sports

In photos: Tokyo Olympics day 6 highlights

An underwater view of swimmers including Team USA's Caeleb Dressel (R) in the final of the Olympic Tokyo Games men's 100m freestyle on July 29. Photo: François-Xavier Marit/AFP via Getty Images

There's been plenty of Olympics drama on day six of the Tokyo Games Thursday — notably China's women's swimming team beating the U.S. and Australia in the record-setting 4x200-meter freestyle relay.

The big picture: Katie Ledecky helped the U.S. win silver, which also beat the previous world record smashed by China's team. Team USA grabbed two more swimming gold medals, when Caeleb Dressel won the men's 100m freestyle and Bobby Finke triumphed in the first men's Olympic 800m freestyle.

Updated 2 hours ago - Sports

Olympics dashboard

Team USA's Simone Biles during the women's team final on day four of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Ariake Gymnastics Centre on Tuesday in Japan. Photo: Fred Lee/Getty Images

🤸🏾‍♀️: Simone Biles reacts to "love and support" after withdrawing from all-around gymnastics and team finals, citing her mental health

🏊‍♂️: Caeleb Dressel wins gold in men's 100m freestyle —Bobby Finke wins gold in first men's Olympic 800m freestyle

📷: In photos: Tokyo Olympics day 6 highlights

🗓: The Olympic events to watch today

🎾: "This one sucks more than the others," Naomi Osaka says on upset loss

🏃‍: Female Olympians push back against double standard in uniforms

Go deeper: Full Axios coverage - Medal tracker