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Manu Fernandez / AP

Netflix co-founder and CEO Reed Hastings spoke with CNBC's Squawk Alley this morning from this year's Code Conference, discussing today's big premiere of season 5 of House of Cards and what's next for the streaming service. Three interesting tidbits…

  1. Netflix's future focus: The company will remain focused on TV and movies, and it has no plans to jump into news or sports as Hastings doesn't want "content that you only want to consume once."
  2. How people watch: Hastings said that two-thirds of viewers watch on large screen televisions, but noted that there's still a lot of room to grow in an Asian market that is much more mobile-centric.
  3. China? "I think that's off the table for the next couple years."

Other things of note:

  • On Amazon: "They're so scary. Everything Amazon does is just so amazing…I don't know if they're the biggest threat, but they're awfully scary."
  • Net neutrality: "Even if [the Trump administration] undermines the Title II rules, my guess would be the net neutrality rules are still followed."
  • How shows get chosen: "Theres some analysis that goes on, but I would say it's fundamentally a creative bet."
  • Will he share House of Cards' ratings? "Absolutely not."
  • What he's watching on Netflix: Force Majeure
  • Netflix's next big show: GLOW, which will premiere this summer from Orange Is the New Black creator Jenji Kohan.

Update: Hastings also spoke later in the morning at the Code Conference, talking up the company's efforts to produce original shows for India especially, but also in Germany, Turkey, Brazil and elsewhere.

"The big focus is on international," Hastings said. In many cases, content created for one market still has appeal elsewhere in the globe.

China, he said, though proved to have too many regulatory hurdles. "We probably assessed it wrong," he said, saying the company's natural optimism it could launch there eventually got "beat down."

Some other highlights from his Code appearance:

On Amazon v. Netflix: "They are trying to be Walmart; we are trying to be Starbucks."

On the possibility of ads on Netflix: "We're really committed to an ad-free experience." (Applause from crowd.)

On net neutrality: The Trump Administration is going to roll back rules no matter what anybody says. Hastings said Netflix still believes in net neutrality, but it is no longer their top policy priority.

Go deeper

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Joe Biden. Photo: Mark Makela/Gettu Images

President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris sat down with CNN on Thursday for their first joint interview since the election.

The big picture: In the hour-long segment, the twosome laid out plans for responding to the pandemic, jump-starting the economy and managing the transition of power, among other priorities.

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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

As the pandemic forces students out of school, broadband deployment programs aren't going to move fast enough to help families in immediate need of better internet access. But Democrats at the Federal Communications Commission say the incoming Biden administration could put a dent in that digital divide with one fast policy change.

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America's hidden depression

Biden introduces his pick for Treasury secretary, Janet Yellen, on Dec. 1. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

President-elect Biden faces a fragile recovery that could easily fall apart, as the economy remains in worse shape than most people think.

Why it matters: There is a recovery happening. But it's helping some people immensely and others not at all. And it's that second part that poses a massive risk to the Biden-Harris administration's chance of success.