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Netflix will bleed more cash this year than analysts expected, but the payoff won’t be more subscribers.

Driving the news: In its earnings report, Netflix said it expects its free cash flow deficit to be $3.5 billion this year — more than the $3 billion loss it previously estimated (the company says it's because of a change in corporate structure and investments in real estate and infrastructure).

  • Netflix also dialed back its expectations for subscriber growth, "anticipating a net add of 5 million paid subscribers for the second quarter," which is below Wall Street’s expectations for 6.09 million new paid members, as Axios’ Sara Fischer reports.
  • CEO Reed Hastings said last quarter that this year would be the peak for cash burn: "We’re still expecting free cash flow to improve in 2020 and each year thereafter, driven by our growing member base, revenues, and operating margins."

Why it matters: Wall Street has given Netflix’s cash burn a pass. The spend on content usually translates into more subscribers driven to the platform for said content. But investors’ knee jerk reaction was to sell the stock after its less-than-stellar guidance.

  • The stock rebounded after initially falling as much as 5% after the bell on Tuesday.

What to watch: With the launch of Disney+, viewers have yet another, cheaper option. This isn't lost on investors. Analysts, however, point out that streaming is not necessarily a zero sum game.

  • Of note: In the face of the heightened competition, Netflix is raising — not cutting — its monthly cost.

Go deeper: The revenue battles of Big Media vs. Netflix

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Trump tightens screws on ByteDance to sell Tiktok

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President Trump added more pressure Friday night on China-based TikTok parent ByteDance to exit the U.S., ordering it to divest all assets related to the U.S. operation of TikTok within 90 days.

Between the lines: The order means ByteDance must be wholly disentangled from TikTok in the U.S. by November. Trump had previously ordered TikTok banned if ByteDance hadn't struck a deal within 45 days. The new order likely means ByteDance has just another 45 days after that to fully close the deal, one White House source told Axios.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m. ET: 21,056,850 — Total deaths: 762,293— Total recoveries: 13,100,902Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m ET: 5,306,215 — Total deaths: 168,334 — Total recoveries: 1,796,309 — Total tests: 65,676,624Map.
  3. Health: CDC: Survivors of COVID-19 have up to three months of immunity Fauci believes normalcy will return by "the end of 2021" with vaccine — The pandemic's toll on mental health — FDA releases first-ever list of medical supplies in shortage.
  4. States: California passes 600,000 confirmed coronavirus cases.
  5. Cities: Coronavirus pandemic dims NYC's annual 9/11 Tribute in Light.
  6. Business: How small businesses got stiffed — Unemployment starts moving in the right direction.
  7. Politics: Biden signals fall strategy with new ads.

Harris: "Women are going to be a priority" in Biden administration

Sen. Kamala Harris at an event in Wilmington, Del. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In her first sit-down interview since being named Joe Biden's running mate, Sen. Kamala Harris talked about what she'll do to fight for women if elected VP, and how the Democrats are thinking about voter turnout strategies ahead of November.

What they're saying: "In a Biden-Harris administration women are going to be a priority, understanding that women have many priorities and all of them must be acknowledged," Harris told The 19th*'s Errin Haines-Whack.