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New data from Integral Ad Science finds that only 53% of display ads in the U.S. met the industry's viewability standards and only 58% of video ads met the industry's viewability standards (below).

Why it matters: Per the study, even if ads do meet viewability standards, digital ad effectiveness in the U.S. still has a long way to go. Only 51% of consumers say they looked at a viewable ad and only 17% say they recalled it. This, combined with an increase in ad-blocking, points to signs that the digital ad landscape needs to continually adjust to consumer preferences and updates in technology.

The good news: New "predictive targeting" tools through programmatic have given advertisers the ability to regain quality control by placing their ads through whitelists in places they are more likely to be loaded and viewed by real people (not bots). For video, the transition from Flash to HTML5 is also helping to weed out unviewable ads.

The U.S. ranks middle of the pack: Per the study, the U.S. digital ad market isn't the worst when it comes to uploading viewability standards, but it's not the best either:

UK: 49.9%France: 50.5%Australia: 51.9%United States: 53.0%Canada: 58.9%Germany: 57.8%

The standards aren't crazy high: The standards are based on recommendations from the media's de facto watchdog group, the independent Media Ratings Council (MRC). According to MRC, here are how often ads need to load in order for them to be considered "viewable":

  • Standard banner ads: At least 50% of the ads are in view for at least 1 second
  • Large format ads: At least 30% of the ads are in view for at least 1 second
  • Video ads: At least 50% of the ads are in view for at least 2 seconds

Go deeper

Federal Reserve expands lending program for small businesses

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell at a news conference in 2019. Photo: Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

The Federal Reserve said on Friday it would again lower the minimum loan size for its pandemic-era small business program.

Details: Businesses and nonprofits will be able to borrow a minimum of $100,000 from the facility, down from $250,000 — a move that might attract smaller businesses that don't need as hefty of a loan. Since the program launched earlier this year, the minimum loan size has been reduced twice.

2 hours ago - Economy & Business

How Trump and Biden would steer the future of transportation

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

President Donald Trump and Democratic challenger Joe Biden would likely steer automotive policy in different directions over the next four years, potentially changing the industry's road map to the future.

Why it matters: The auto industry is on the cusp of historic technological changes and the next president — as well as the next Congress — could have an extraordinary influence on how the future of transportation plays out.