NCAA President Mark Emmert. Photo: Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images

NCAA President Mark Emmert said that it's not likely all schools will simultaneously be ready to start their seasons this fall, in an interview on Friday night.

Why it matters: States across the country are seeing varying impacts from the coronavirus — making it more reasonable that teams will have varying start dates and total number of games for the season, AP writes.

What he's saying: Emmert wants to ensure all 130 teams across 10 conferences and 41 states have the same amount of time for pre-season preparation.

  • “All the various (NCAA) member committees and the conferences are all talking about: What does it mean if we have that sort of scenario where we’ve got different opening times or different opening models."
  • "If you don’t have students on campus, you don’t have student-athletes on campus. That doesn't mean it has to be up and running in the full normal model, but you've got to treat the health and well-being of athletes as much as the regular students. So if a school doesn't reopen, then they aren't going to be playing sports."
  • “What does it mean if you look at a conference, for example, if a conference has some schools open and some not? “You can’t run a regular schedule if you’ve got that scenario. How do you adjust all the rules to provide as much flexibility as you possibly can to let student-athletes have a good experience in that season?”

Go deeper: Coronavirus grants NCAA spring athletes an extra season of eligibility

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Aug 3, 2020 - Sports

Pac-12 football players threaten coronavirus opt-out

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

A group of Pac-12 football players have threatened to opt out of the season unless the conference addresses systemic inequities and concerns related to the coronavirus pandemic.

Why it matters: College football players have never had more leverage than they do right now, as the sport tries to stage a season amid the pandemic. And their willingness to use it shows we've entered a new age in college sports.

Virtual school is another setback for struggling retail industry

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

A virtual school year will likely push retailers even closer to the brink.

Why it matters: Back-to-school season is the second-biggest revenue generating period for the retail sector, after the holidays. But retailers say typical shopping sprees will be smaller with students learning at home — another setback for their industry, which has seen a slew of store closures and bankruptcy filings since the pandemic hit.

Fauci: Schools can reopen with safeguards, but those in virus hot spots shouldn't

Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases, at Capitol Hill in July. Photo Kevin Dietsch-Pool/Getty Images

NIAID director Anthony Fauci said Monday schools and colleges should be able to reopen for in-person classes, but they must take precautions to ensure the safety of students and teachers during the pandemic, per CNN.

Of note: Students benefit psychologically from being in a classroom, Fauci said. The American Academy of Pediatrics has advocated for in-person classes resuming, noting in a statement the mental health benefits of doing so. "[T]here is already evidence of the negative impacts on children because of school closures in the spring of 2020."