Photo: G Fiume/Maryland Terrapins/Getty Images

The NCAA announced Thursday that it has postponed Division I fall championships as individual conferences cancel their seasons due to concerns tied to the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Universities have tried to find ways to safely move forward with fall sports, a major source of revenue for schools. Fall championships for Division II and III were already put on hold.

The state of play: NCAA President Mark Emmert said the championships were mainly postponed because there are not enough schools participating, ESPN reports.

  • The decision will impact 22 championships, including FCS football.
  • Some FCS schools plan to move forward with non-conference football games, but won't have a NCAA-sponsored championship, West Virginia athletic director Shane Lyons, chair of the NCAA's Football Oversight Committee, told ESPN.

What to watch: Emmert supports the idea of using bubbles for NCAA championships in the first half of 2021, saying it's "perfectly viable for many sports," ESPN notes.

  • "If we need to do a bubble model and that's the only way we can do it, then we'll figure that out."

Go deeper

Kendall Baker, author of Sports
Aug 20, 2020 - Sports

College football's coronavirus confusion isn't new

Nick Saban in his practice field mask. Photo: University of Alabama

Most schools have postponed college football, and others are dealing with coronavirus outbreaks — yet the season remains on track to begin in a few weeks for six of the 10 biggest conferences.

The big picture: It's not an exact parallel, but college football faced similar confusion and uncertainty 102 years ago, when the 1918 influenza pandemic — combined with WWI — led to a bizarre, shortened season.

How "naked ballots" could upend mail-in voting in Pennsylvania

Trump signs in Olyphant, Penn. Photo: Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

Pennsylvania's Supreme Court ordered state officials last week to throw out mail-in ballots submitted without a required inner "secrecy" envelope in November's election, the Philadelphia Inquirer reports.

The state of play: The decision went under the radar alongside the simultaneous decision to extend the time that mail-in ballots could be counted, but Philadelphia's top elections official warned state legislators this week that throwing out so-called "naked ballots" could bring "electoral chaos" to the state and cause "tens of thousands of votes" to be thrown out — potentially tipping the presidential election.

Commission releases topics for first presidential debate

Moderator Chris Wallace. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Fox News anchor Chris Wallace has selected what topics he'll cover while moderating the first presidential debate between President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden next week.

What to watch: Topics for the Sept. 29 debate will include Trump and Biden's records, the Supreme Court, COVID-19, economic policy, racism and the integrity of the election, the Commission for Presidential Debates announced on Tuesday. Each topic will receive 15 minutes of conversation and will be presented in no particular order.

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