Henry Shimp of Stanford analyzes the green during the Division I Men's Golf Match Play Championship last year. Photo: Jack Dempsey/NCAA Photos via Getty Images

The NCAA released its annual Academic Progress Rate (APR) report on Tuesday, which offers a snapshot of academic performance over a four-year span.

How it works: 1,000 is the top score, and programs are penalized with reduced scholarships and postseason bans if they dip below 930 — a score that predicts a 50% graduation rate.

Men's D-I sports: Golf, ice hockey and lacrosse have the highest four-year APRs, while FBS football, basketball and FCS football have the lowest.

Data: NCAA; Note: Sports with 50+ teams shown. Chart: Axios Visuals

Women's D-I sports: Gymnastics, lacrosse and swimming have the highest four-year APRs, while softball, track and field and basketball have the lowest.

Data: NCAA; Note: Sports with 50+ teams shown. Chart: Axios Visuals

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Kendall Baker, author of Sports
Aug 12, 2020 - Sports

Big Ten, Pac-12 postpone football as ACC, SEC, Big 12 don't

Photo: James Black/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

The slim prospects of a fall college football season have evaporated in a matter of days — but don't tell that to the ACC, SEC and Big 12, which are still trying to make their seasons happen.

The state of play: The Big Ten and Pac-12 postponed all fall sports to the spring on Tuesday. No football, cross country, volleyball, soccer or field hockey.

Kendall Baker, author of Sports
Aug 12, 2020 - Sports

Sports betting in the age of coronavirus

Reproduced from American Gaming Association; Cartogram: Axios Visuals

When the pandemic arrived, the sports betting industry funneled bettors toward the few sports that were actually happening.

What's happening: Now that sports have returned, the industry has benefited from pent-up demand, while also capitalizing on a busier-than-usual summer, with baseball, soccer, hockey, golf and basketball all in full swing.

Updated 9 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in state in Capitol's National Statuary Hall

Photo: Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced Monday that the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in state in the Capitol's National Statuary Hall on Friday, making Ginsburg the first woman to ever receive the honor.

The state of play: The Supreme Court also announced Monday that Ginsburg will lie in repose on the front steps of the building on Wednesday and Thursday, allowing the public to pay respects to the late justice outside.