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Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Peter Burghart / U.S. Navy photo via AP

Two U.S. Navy ships that were involved in deadly collisions this summer did not meet training requirements, according to Government Accountability Office data, which CNN obtained.

  • The failures: 10 out of 10 warfare mission areas expired for the USS Fitzgerald in June. 6 of 10 expired for the USS John S. McCain.
  • The trend: 37% of the training certifications for the Navy's 11 cruisers and destroyers in Japan expired this June. Two-thirds of those had been expired for at least 5 months.
  • Quick catchup: The USS Fitzgerald's commanding officer, executive officer, and senior non-commissioned officer were relieved of duty after its collision. The U.S. Navy is currently undergoing a review of how it trains, maintains, and deploys fleets in light of the recent deadly collisions.

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Updated 7 hours ago - Politics & Policy

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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: The good and bad news about antibody therapies — Fauci: Hotspots have materialized across "the entire country."
  2. World: Belgium imposes lockdown, citing "health emergency" due to influx of cases.
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
  4. Education: Surge threatens to shut classrooms down again.
  5. Technology: The pandemic isn't slowing tech.
  6. Travel: CDC replaces COVID-19 cruise ban with less restrictive "conditional sailing order."
  7. Sports: High school football's pandemic struggles.
  8. 🎧Podcast: The vaccine race turns toward nationalism.
Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
Updated 7 hours ago - Economy & Business

Dunkin' Brands agrees to $11B Inspire Brands sale

Photo: Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images

Dunkin' Brands, operator of both Dunkin' Donuts and Baskin-Robbins, agreed on Friday to be taken private for nearly $11.3 billion, including debt, by Inspire Brands, a restaurant platform sponsored by private equity firm Roark Capital.

Why it matters: Buying Dunkin’ will more than double Inspire’s footprint, making it one of the biggest restaurant deals in the past 10 years. This could ultimately set up an IPO for Inspire, which already owns Arby's, Jimmy John's and Buffalo Wild Wings.

Ina Fried, author of Login
9 hours ago - Technology

Federal judge halts Trump administration limit on TikTok

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

A federal judge on Friday issued an injunction preventing the Trump administration from imposing limits on the distribution of TikTok, Bloomberg reports. The injunction request came as part of a suit brought by creators who make a living on the video service.

Why it matters: The administration has been seeking to force a sale of, or block, the Chinese-owned service. It also moved to ban the service from operating in the U.S. as of Nov. 12, a move which was put on hold by Friday's injunction.