Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, brushing off new comments by Robert Mueller and 2020 Democratic hopefuls, feels as strongly as ever that impeaching President Trump would be a "fool’s errand," a top ally told Axios. 

Why it matters: Pelosi remains defiant, despite growing calls from fellow Democrats to plunge quickly into impeachment.

  • Ironically, Pelosi is leading the charge against impeachment while GOP Rep. Justin Amash of Michigan is leading the charge for it.

By the numbers: Politico says the whip count in favor of impeachment is 41 House members (42 if you include Amash), representing "fewer than 20% of House Democrats, and less than 10% of the House."

Driving the news: More 2020 candidates spoke favorably of impeachment yesterday after a dramatic 11 a.m. appearance by special counsel Robert Mueller at the Justice Department, where he said charging Trump with a crime was "not an option" because of federal rules.

  • Mueller's crucial quote: "[I]f we had had confidence that the president clearly did not commit a crime, we would have said so."
  • Mueller, announcing he was "resigning from the Department of Justice and returning to private life," closed by saying: "[T]here were multiple, systematic efforts to interfere in our election. That allegation deserves the attention of every American." (Transcript)

What to watch: Ignore the noise from 2020 candidates, outside groups and talking heads. What matters most is if any top Democratic House leaders turn against Pelosi. So far, they are all falling in line. 

  • Speaking at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco after Mueller's statement, Pelosi said the House Democratic chairs will continue to investigate and added: "Nothing is off the table."

Between the lines: People who know Pelosi well tell Axios' Jonathan Swan that she, perhaps uniquely in the Democratic Party, has the power to withstand the growing momentum towards impeachment.

  • And they believe there’s no way House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler, whose committee would handle impeachment, would defy her wishes — even if the chorus gets even louder, as long as she put her foot down.

How it's playing ... WashPost 5-column lead story: "Mueller’s remarks fuel impeachment calls."

Go deeper: The new case for impeachment

Go deeper

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 6 p.m. ET: 13,203,571 — Total deaths: 575,201 — Total recoveries — 7,331,068Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 6 p.m. ET: 3,407,798 — Total deaths: 136,252 — Total recoveries: 1,031,939 — Total tested: 41,004,275Map.
  3. Politics: Biden welcomes Trump wearing mask in public but warns "it’s not enough"
  4. Public health: Four former CDC heads say Trump's undermining of agency puts lives at risk — CDC director: U.S. could get coronavirus "under control" in 4–8 weeks if all wear masks.

Bank CEOs brace for worsening economic scenario

JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon. Photo: J. Lawler Duggan/For The Washington Post via Getty Images

Wells Fargo swung to its first loss since the financial crisis — while JPMorgan Chase and Citigroup reported significantly lower profits from a year earlier — as the banks set aside billions of dollars more in the second quarter for loans that may go bad.

Why it matters: The cumulative $28 billion in loan loss provisions that banks have so far announced they’re reserving serves as a signal they’re preparing for a colossal wave of loan defaults as the economy slogs through a coronavirus-driven downturn.

2 hours ago - Health

Moderna's vaccine spurred immune system response to coronavirus

Moderna's stock rose 16% after hours on this news. Photo: Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Healthy volunteers who took Moderna's coronavirus vaccine candidate appeared to generate an immune system response to the virus, and there were "no trial-limiting safety concerns," according to a new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Why it matters: The phase one trial is still small and does not definitively determine how effective the vaccine is. But Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health, which is running the trial, told the Wall Street Journal that these data make it "pretty clear that this vaccine is capable of inducing quite good [levels] of neutralizing antibodies."