Rep. Jerrold Nadler on July 9. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nader (D-N.Y.) announced in a statement on Friday that the committee will consider two bills next week that would curtail presidential pardon and commutation powers.

Why it matters: The bills come just one week after President Trump commuted the sentence of his longtime associate Roger Stone, who faced 40 months in prison for crimes including obstruction, witness tampering and making false statements to Congress.

The first bill, the Abuse of the Pardon Power Prevention Act, would allow Justice Department investigators to give Congress materials related to crimes for which the president is pardoning or the sentence a president is commuting.

  • The second, the No President is Above the Law Act, would "pause the clock" on the statute of limitations for any crimes a president may have committed while in office, Nadler noted.

What he's saying: “President Trump and his friend Roger Stone did what they said they would do," Nadler wrote. "Stone misled federal investigators, intimidated witnesses, and was convicted for obstruction of justice — but would not testify to the President’s wrongdoing."

  • "In exchange, President Trump made sure that Stone will never spend a day in prison. This quid pro quo is unacceptable. Congress must act."
  • “These are commonsense, good government reforms made necessary by this President’s conduct but applicable to anyone who may hold the office in the future.  In this country, no one is above the law — not President Trump, and not presidents to come.”

The big picture: Republican Judiciary Committee members who supported Stone's commutation will likely push back against the bills.

  • Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio), the ranking member of the Judiciary Committee, supported the commutation last week on Twitter, saying "Roger Stone’s prosecution by overzealous Special Counsel prosecutors was an outgrowth of the Obama-Biden misconduct."

Go deeper: Robert Mueller speaks out on Roger Stone commutation

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Ukraine's Zelensky warns citizens not to interfere in U.S. elections

Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky attends a meeting in a Parliamentary Hall in Kyiv, Ukraine, in July. Photo: Sergii Kharchenko/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky issued a statement on his Facebook page Saturday stating that it "is never and under no circumstances acceptable to interfere with another country's sovereign elections."

Why it matters: National Counterintelligence and Security Center Director William Evanina said Friday the Russian government had taken action to "denigrate former Vice President Biden" before November's election and that a "pro-Russia" Ukrainian lawmaker was "spreading claims about corruption" to "undermine" the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee.

A quandary for state unemployment agencies

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

State agencies charged with paying unemployment benefits to jobless residents have their backs against the wall as they rush to parse President Trump's executive actions on coronavirus aid.

Why it matters: States are being asked to pitch in $100 per unemployed resident, but it’s a heavy lift for cash-strapped states that are still unclear about the details and may not opt-in at all. It leaves the states and jobless residents in a state of limbo.

Updated 32 mins ago - Health

New Zealand reports first local coronavirus cases for 102 days

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern after a press conference at Parliament on July 22 in Wellington, New Zealand. Photo: Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images

AUCKLAND, New Zealand — Auckland is locking down and the rest of New Zealand faces lesser restrictions for 72 hours after a family of four tested positive for COVID-19, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced Tuesday.

Why it matters: It's the first cases not in managed isolation for 102 days, Ardern said at a news briefing.