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Many political power leaders are raising eyebrows in Washington, and some are even invoking questions of deeper investigations. CNN, WSJ, and WashPost each take a look at three different plots:

Sen. Dianne Feinstein (Calif.), the top Democrat on Senate Intelligence, to Brianna Keilar on CNN's "State of the Union," re Comey's testimony that he felt pressured by Obama attorney general Loretta Lynch:

"I would have a queasy feeling, too, ... to be candid with you. I think we need to know more about that. And there's only way to know about it, and that's to have the Judiciary Committee take a look at that."

Driving tomorrow ... Wall Street Journal front-pager, "Sessions's Testimony to Keep Russia Probe in Focus," by Laura Meckler and Jeffrey Sparshott: "Attorney General Jeff Sessions will testify Tuesday before the same Senate committee that heard from former FBI Director James Comey last week ... It is unclear whether the intelligence committee hearing will be held in public."

"When a liberal power lawyer

represents the Trump family, things can get ugly," WashPost front-pager by Marc Fisher: "When [Jamie] Gorelick [deputy attorney general under Bill Clinton] signed up Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump ... as clients, she knew her friends might raise their collective eyebrows. She didn't know that some of them would call her a turncoat."

  • "For generations, the premier D.C. lawyer-fixers were ... [m]en such as Clark Clifford, A.B. Culvahouse Jr., Edward Bennett Williams, Howard Baker, Lloyd Cutler and Robert Strauss, ... amassing thoroughly bipartisan client rosters. ... Gore lick [is] one of the first women to join that elite club."
  • "Hilary Rosen ... tweeted, 'Hey Jamie Gorelick, you've just poured that "Complicit" perfume on yourself."

Go deeper

Brazil begins distributing AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine

Containers carrying doses of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine arrive in Brazil. Photo: Maurio Pimentel/AFP via Getty Images

Brazil on Saturday began distributing the 2 million doses of the AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine that arrived from India Friday, Reuters reports.

Why it matters: Brazil has the third highest COVID-19 case-count in the world, according to Johns Hopkins University data. The 2 million doses "only scratch the surface of the shortfall," Brazilian public health experts told the AP.

Sullivan speaks with Israel's national security adviser for the first time

Israeli national security adviser Meir Ben Shabbat U.S. Photo: Mazen Mahdi/Getty Images. U.S. national security adviser Jake Sullivan. Photo: Chandan Khanna/Getty Images

U.S. national security adviser Jake Sullivan spoke on the phone Saturday with his Israeli counterpart Meir Ben Shabbat, Israeli officials tell Axios.

Why it matters: This is the first contact between the Biden White House and Israeli prime minister's office. During the transition, the Biden team refrained from speaking to foreign governments.

Biden speaks to Mexican president about reversing Trump's "draconian immigration policies"

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador. Ismael Rosas/Eyepix Group/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

President Biden told his Mexican counterpart, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, on a phone call Friday that he plans to reverse former President Trump’s “draconian immigration policies.”

The big picture: The Biden administration has already started repealing several of Trump’s immigration policies, including ordering a 100-day freeze on deporting many unauthorized immigrants, halting work on the southern border wall, and reversing plans to exclude undocumented people from being included in the 2020 census.