Jun 12, 2017

Mushrooming investigations

Many political power leaders are raising eyebrows in Washington, and some are even invoking questions of deeper investigations. CNN, WSJ, and WashPost each take a look at three different plots:

Sen. Dianne Feinstein (Calif.), the top Democrat on Senate Intelligence, to Brianna Keilar on CNN's "State of the Union," re Comey's testimony that he felt pressured by Obama attorney general Loretta Lynch:

"I would have a queasy feeling, too, ... to be candid with you. I think we need to know more about that. And there's only way to know about it, and that's to have the Judiciary Committee take a look at that."

Driving tomorrow ... Wall Street Journal front-pager, "Sessions's Testimony to Keep Russia Probe in Focus," by Laura Meckler and Jeffrey Sparshott: "Attorney General Jeff Sessions will testify Tuesday before the same Senate committee that heard from former FBI Director James Comey last week ... It is unclear whether the intelligence committee hearing will be held in public."

"When a liberal power lawyer

represents the Trump family, things can get ugly," WashPost front-pager by Marc Fisher: "When [Jamie] Gorelick [deputy attorney general under Bill Clinton] signed up Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump ... as clients, she knew her friends might raise their collective eyebrows. She didn't know that some of them would call her a turncoat."

  • "For generations, the premier D.C. lawyer-fixers were ... [m]en such as Clark Clifford, A.B. Culvahouse Jr., Edward Bennett Williams, Howard Baker, Lloyd Cutler and Robert Strauss, ... amassing thoroughly bipartisan client rosters. ... Gore lick [is] one of the first women to join that elite club."
  • "Hilary Rosen ... tweeted, 'Hey Jamie Gorelick, you've just poured that "Complicit" perfume on yourself."

Go deeper

Updated 17 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Updates: George Floyd protests continue for 8th day

Police officers wearing riot gear push back demonstrators outside of the White House on Monday. Photo: Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images

Protests over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black people continued Tuesday across the U.S. for the eighth consecutive day, prompting a federal response from the National Guard, Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Customs and Border Protection.

The latest: The National Park Service said in a statement Tuesday that while it "is committed to the peaceful expression of First Amendment rights," it "cannot tolerate violence to citizens or officers or damage to our nation’s resources that we are entrusted to protect."

American carnage

Protesters race up a hill to avoid tear gas in Philadelphia, June 1. Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

The list of victims has swiftly grown since George Floyd died in police custody just eight days ago.

The big picture: Protests against police brutality have turned into a showcase of police brutality, with tear gas and rubber bullets deployed against crowds. The police have the arsenals at their disposal, but we're also seeing law enforcement officers becoming targets.

McConnell blocks resolution condemning Trump's actions against peaceful protesters

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) blocked a resolution introduced by Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) on Tuesday that would have condemned the use of tear gas and rubber bullets against peaceful protesters outside the White House on Monday in order to allow President Trump to walk to St. John's Church.

What they're saying: "Justice for black Americans in the face of unjust violence, and peace for our country in the face of looting, riots, and domestic terror. Those are the two issues Americans want addressed," McConnell said on the Senate floor.