Get the latest market trends in your inbox

Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with the Axios Markets newsletter. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser said on NBC's "Meet the Press" on Sunday that President Trump's tweets about protests over the death of George Floyd are "divisive" and draw from the "segregationist past of our country."

Driving the news: A Friday tweet by Trump, which was later flagged by Twitter for violating its rules about "glorifying violence," called protestors "THUGS" and used the phrase, "when the looting starts, the shooting starts."

  • The phrase was coined in 1967 by Miami police chief Walter Headley, who was criticized by civil rights leaders who argued the Miami police force unfairly discriminated against black residents. Headley once said his officers "don't mind being accused of police brutality."
  • The phrase was later used by segregationist presidential candidate George Wallace. Trump claimed on Friday that he didn't know the history behind the phrase.

What she's saying: Bowser told "Meet the Press" that Trump "has a responsibility to help calm the nation, and he can start by not sending divisive tweets. ... We certainly urge him to do that."

  • "We have systematic issues in our country to address, and it's going to take us at every level — federal and local — it's going to take community and government to heal the hurt that people are feeling," Bowser added.
  • "So what you see in cities across our nation, what we saw last night, are people who are angry and people who are hurting, and some not doing it in ways that are helpful to our cause. But we still have to acknowledge that hurt and that anger."

Go deeper ... Atlanta mayor on Trump's riot response: "He speaks and he makes it worse"

Go deeper

Over 190 law enforcement officials endorse Biden

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Over 190 law enforcement officials on Friday endorsed Joe Biden for president, per a campaign statement.

Why it matters: The endorsements rebut a theme of the Trump re-election campaign, which has falsely claimed that Biden wants to defund the police. Both candidates this week traveled to Kenosha, Wisconsin to address the shooting of Jacob Blake. Biden called for officers involved to be charged while Trump cracked down on protests that had turned violent.

USAID chief tests positive for coronavirus

An Air Force cargo jet delivers USAID supplies to Russia earlier this year. Photo: Mikhail Metzel/TASS via Getty Images

The acting administrator of the United States Agency for International Development informed senior staff Wednesday he has tested positive for coronavirus, two sources familiar with the call tell Axios.

Why it matters: John Barsa, who staffers say rarely wears a mask in their office, is the latest in a series of senior administration officials to contract the virus. His positive diagnosis comes amid broader turmoil at the agency following the election.

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
3 hours ago - Health

COVID-19 shows a bright future for vaccines

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Promising results from COVID-19 vaccine trials offer hope not just that the pandemic could be ended sooner than expected, but that medicine itself may have a powerful new weapon.

Why it matters: Vaccines are, in the words of one expert, "the single most life-saving innovation ever," but progress had slowed in recent years. New gene-based technology that sped the arrival of the COVID vaccine will boost the overall field, and could even extend to mass killers like cancer.