Robert Mueller. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) has issued a subpoena to the Justice Department to obtain the unredacted Mueller report.

The bottom line: “We have seen so far none of the actual evidence that the Special Counsel developed to make the case," Nadler wrote on Friday.

I have issued a subpoena to the Department of Justice for the full version of the Mueller report and the underlying evidence. The Department is required to comply with that subpoena by May 1.
I am open to working with the Department to reach a reasonable accommodation for access to these materials, however I cannot accept any proposal which leaves most of Congress in the dark, as they grapple with their duties of legislation, oversight and constitutional accountability.
My Committee needs and is entitled to the full version of the report and the underlying evidence consistent with past practice. The redactions appear to be significant. We have so far seen none of the actual evidence that the Special Counsel developed to make this case. Even the redacted version of the report outlines serious instances of wrongdoing by President Trump and some of his closest associates. it now falls to Congress to determine the full scope of that alleged misconduct and to decide what steps we must take going forward."
— Nadler's statement in his Friday morning tweet.

The other side: House Judiciary ranking member Rep. Doug Collins (R-Ga.) slammed the subpoena on Friday, calling it "wildly overboard" as he encouraged Nadler to extend the response deadline past May 1 and narrow its terms, the New York Times reports.

What to watch: The chairs and ranking members of the House and Senate Judiciary Committees, the "Gang of Eight" and 1 designated staffer per member will receive a version of the Mueller report that only includes redactions for grand jury information.

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