Attorney General Bill Barr. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Justice Department spokesperson Kerri Kupec said Monday that a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report is expected to be released on Thursday morning.

What to watch: The report is expected to be around 400 pages, not including underlying evidence. Attorney General Bill Barr said he would color code redacted information that falls into 4 categories, and that each redaction will include explanatory notes.

Those categories include:

  • Material subject to Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure (6e) that cannot be made public.
  • Material the intelligence community identifies as potentially compromising sensitive sources and methods.
  • Material that could affect other ongoing matters, including those that the special counsel has referred to other department offices.
  • Information that would unduly infringe on the personal privacy and reputational interests of peripheral third parties.

Barr told a House Appropriations subcommittee that once the redacted version of the report is sent to Congress, he would be "glad to talk to [House Judiciary] chairman Nadler and [Senate Judiciary] chairman Graham as to whether they feel they need more information and see if there’s a way we could accommodate that."

  • Barr said that he doesn't believe he has the latitude to release grand jury material and that he doesn't intend to ask a judge to unseal it. He added, however, that Nadler is free to make the request if he wants.

Go deeper: Behind the scenes: The White House prepares for Mueller week

Go deeper

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m. ET: 33,867,247 — Total deaths: 1,012,341 — Total recoveries: 23,537,059Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 8 p.m. ET: 7,229,319 — Total deaths: 206,887 — Total recoveries: 2,840,688 — Total tests: 103,939,667Map.
  3. Education: School-aged children now make up 10% of all U.S COVID-19 cases.
  4. Health: The coronavirus' alarming impact on the body.
  5. Business: Real-time data show economy's rebound slowing but still going.
  6. Sports: Steelers-Titans NFL game delayed after coronavirus outbreak.
Ina Fried, author of Login
3 hours ago - Technology

Facebook removes Trump ads tying refugees to COVID-19

Photo Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook said Wednesday that it was removing a series of ads from President Trump's campaign that linked American acceptance of refugees with increased coronavirus risk, a connection Facebook says is without merit.

Why it matters: The ads were pulled after they received thousands of impressions and are a sign that the Trump campaign continues to test the limits of social media rules on false information.

Over 73 million people watched the first debate on TV

Data: Nielsen; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

More than 73.1 million people watched the first presidential debate on television on Tuesday night, according to Nielsen ratings.

Why it matters: While that's a sizable audience for any American TV program, it's down more than 13% from the record number of TV viewers who tuned in for the first debate of the 2016 election. The chaotic nature of the debate and the overall uncertainty around this year's election may have pushed some viewers away.