MSNBC's Chris Matthews in Las Vegas on Saturday. Photo: Ethan Miller/Getty Images

MSNBC's Chris Matthews apologized at the start of his "Hardball" show Monday for comparing during a broadcast Sen. Bernie Sanders' Nevada caucuses win to the Nazi invasion of France.

What he's saying: "I was wrong to refer to an event from the last days — or actually the first days of WWII," Matthews said. "Senator Sanders, I am sorry for comparing anything from that tragic era in which so many suffered, especially the Jewish people, to an electoral result in which you were the well-deserved winner." He went on to congratulate Sanders for the win.

Why it matters: Matthews faced calls to resign after he used the analogy when Sanders took an early lead Saturday night, lamenting that it's too late to stop the Vermont senator in the Democratic presidential race. Sanders is Jewish and has opened up during the 2020 campaign about his family's experience of the Holocaust.

Flashback: "I was reading last night about the fall of France in the summer of 1940 and the general, Reynaud, calls up Churchill and says, 'It's over,'" Matthews said Saturday. "And Churchill says, 'How can that be? You've got the greatest army in Europe. How can it be over?' He said, 'It's over.'"

Go deeper: Bernie's juggernaut

Editor's note: This article has been updated with new details throughout.

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GOP senators scold Trump over St. John's photo op

Sen. Tim Scott. Photo: Andrew Harnik - Pool/Getty Images

Republican lawmakers are weighing in on President Trump's decision to tear gas and physically clear peaceful protesters from outside the White House on Monday in order to stand in front of the historic St. John's Episcopal Church for a photo.

The state of play: While some Republicans are backing the president's actions and condemning protesters, others have criticized the decision and called for improvement.

Updated May 31, 2020 - Politics & Policy

George Floyd protests: What you need to know

Photo: David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Clashes erupted between law enforcement and protesters in several major U.S. cities Saturday night as demonstrations over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black men spread across the country.

The big picture: Floyd's death in Minneapolis police custody is the latest reminder of the disparities between black and white communities in the U.S. and comes as African Americans grapple with higher death rates from the coronavirus and higher unemployment from trying to stem its spread.

Police officers targeted during unrest across U.S.

Law enforcement officers were targeted in several cities during tense standoffs overnight.

What's happening: A police officer was shot on Las Vegas Strip late Monday, per AP. No further details were immediately available. In St Louis, four police officers were struck by gunfire while standing near a line in after a peaceful demonstration, Police Chief John Hayden said early Tuesday.