Aug 15, 2017

More CEOs may ditch Trump

Alex Brandon / AP

"Merck & Co.'s Kenneth Frazier, then Under Armour Inc.'s Kevin Plank and Intel Corp.'s Brian Krzanich stepped down from a White House business group" (Manufacturing Jobs Initiative), per Bloomberg's Jeff Green:

"While none mentioned the president, Frazier, one of the country's most-prominent black chief executive officers, ... said he was acting on a 'matter of personal conscience.'"Trump quickly tweeted: "Now that Ken Frazier of Merck Pharma has resigned from President's Manufacturing Council,he will have more time to LOWER RIPOFF DRUG PRICES!""As for Intel's Krzanich, his Twitter account was peppered [yesterday] by pleas for him to quit the White House group."Who's next? Davia Temin, head of the New York-based crisis-management firm Temin & Co: "This conversation is viral in boardrooms right now."Be smart: We know another prominent CEO who's agonizing over whether to quit a White House group; others are discussing it internally. And Axios business editor Dan Primack pointed out after Trump's tweet: "This sort of thing will only discourage other CEOs from formally engaging with the White House."Go deeper: "The CEOs who have left Trump's special councils."

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Coronavirus kills 2 Diamond Princess passengers and South Korea sees first death

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. U.S. numbers include Americans extracted from Princess Cruise ship.

Two elderly Diamond Princess passengers have been killed by the novel coronavirus — the first deaths confirmed among the more than 600 infected aboard the cruise ship. South Korea also announced its first death Thursday.

The big picture: COVID-19 has now killed more than 2,200 people and infected over 75,465 others, mostly in mainland China, where the National Health Commission announced 118 new deaths since Thursday.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 5 hours ago - Health

SoftBank to cut its stake to get T-Mobile's Sprint deal done

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

T-Mobile and Sprint announced a revised merger agreement that will see SoftBank getting a smaller share of the combined company, while most shareholders will receive the previously agreed upon exchange rate. The companies said they hope to get the deal as early as April 1.

Why it matters: The amended deal reflects the decline in Sprint's business, while leaving most shareholders' stake intact and removing another hurdle to the deal's closure.