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Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty

President Trump on Tuesday said that his summit with North Korea's Kim Jong-un may not go ahead as planned, adding that if the June 12 date does not hold, "maybe it will happen later.”

Why it matters: It wasn’t long ago that Trump and the North Koreans were trading threats of nuclear war. If the summit collapses, relations between the two countries could deteriorate quickly.

The back story: The comments came as South Korean President Moon Jae-in arrived at the White House to meet with Trump about the planned summit, which is scheduled for three weeks from today. The buildup to what would be an historic summit sparked speculation about a long-sought breakthrough with North Korea, and even a Nobel Prize for Trump.

Key comments:

  • Seated beside Moon, Trump said "there are certain conditions that we want" ahead of the summit, and if they aren't met the summit won't happen.
  • Trump said "denuclearization must take place" and that he would prefer if it was "all in one" but he wouldn't commit himself to that approach.
  • He also said of Kim "we will guarantee his safety" under the terms of a deal, and that China, South Korea and Japan were all willing to invest big sums of money to "make North Korea great."
  • Trump wouldn't say whether he had spoken to Kim, but said the two sides were in communication. He also said Moon "may or may not" have a separate meeting with Kim.
  • Trump said he believes Kim had a "different attitude" after meeting for the second time with Chinese President Xi Jinping — adding that the U.S. did not know that meeting would be taking place.

Between the lines: Moon is one of the few world leaders to have met face-to-face with Kim Jong-un. On his way to White House, the chief of South Korea's National Security Office said the Trump-Kim summit is almost certain to happen, but they are preparing for every scenario, per Yonhap News.

Context: The meeting follows a surprise move by North Korea last week to cancel a meeting with the South Koreans and threaten to cancel the summit with Trump over joint U.S.-South Korean military drills.

Go deeper: Why Kim threatened to cancel the summit.

Go deeper

Why migrants are fleeing their homes for the U.S.

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios Photo: Herika Martinez /Getty Images 

Natural disasters in Central America, economic devastation, gang wars, political oppression, and a new administration are all driving the sharp rise in U.S.-Mexico border crossings — a budding crisis for President Biden.

Why it matters: Migration flows are complex and quickly politicized. Biden's policies are likely sending signals that are encouraging the surge — but that's only a small reason it's happening.

Cities' pandemic struggle to balance homelessness and public safety

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Addressing homelessness has taken on new urgency in cities across the country over the past year, as officials grapple with a growing unhoused population and the need to preserve public safety during the coronavirus pandemic.

Why it matters: It’s led to tension when cities move in to clear encampments — often for health and safety reasons — causing some to rethink the role of law enforcement when interacting with people experiencing homelessness.

Biden to sign voting rights order to mark "Bloody Sunday" anniversary

President Biden will sign an executive order today, on the 56th anniversary of "Bloody Sunday," meant to promote voting rights, according to an administration official.

Why it matters: The executive order comes as Democrats face an uphill battle to pass a sweeping election bill meant, in part, to combat a growing number of proposals introduced by Republicans at the state level that would restrict voter access.