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Ahn Young-joon / AP

Moon Jae-in is the new president of South Korea. The liberal candidate beat his conservative counterpart, Hong Joon-Pyo, in a projected landslide. However, Moon's stance on North Korea could present a rift with the U.S.

Who is he? Moon is the son of North Korean refugees and was an ardent protestor against Park Chung-hee, the South Korean military ruler and father of former president Park Geun-hye.

Why it matters: He will be responsible for managing South Korea's relationships with North Korea and the U.S. He wants to increase dialogue with North Korea, which is a stark difference from the stricter relations maintained over the last 10 years. And he is reportedly not happy with the U.S.deploying an anti-missile system on South Korean land.

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Why it matters: Climate and clean energy initiatives at colleges and universities are nothing new, but it shows expanded an campus focus as the effects of climate change are becoming increasingly apparent, and the world is nowhere near the steep emissions cuts that scientists say are needed to hold future warming in check.

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The pandemic isn't slowing tech

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Thursday's deluge of Big Tech earnings reports showed one thing pretty clearly: COVID-19 may be bad in all sorts of ways, but it's not slowing down the largest tech companies. If anything, it's helping some companies, like Amazon and Apple.

Yes, but: With the pandemic once again worsening in the U.S. and Europe, it's not clear how long the tech industry's winning streak can last.

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Early voting in Austin earlier this month. Photo: Sergio Flores/Getty Images

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Why it matters: The state's 38 Electoral College votes are in play — and could deliver a knockout blow for Joe Biden over President Trump — despite the fact that it hasn't backed a Democrat for president since 1976.