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Pre-pandemic, downtown Minneapolis was a happening spot in the summer. Photo: Marlin Levison/Star Tribune via Getty Images

Adam Sacks, president of tourism economics for Oxford Economics, told the virtual Meet Minneapolis annual meeting on Thursday that 19 million Americans might opt for a domestic vacation instead of an international trip this year.

Why it matters: More people staying at home would be good for a faster tourism rebound in our area.

The state of play: Cities like Minneapolis are poised to capture post-vaccine travel as people whose earnings were unaffected by the pandemic get ready to spend, Sacks said.

  • He predicts travel picking back up as we head into summer.

Yes but: Sacks was followed at the event by Mayor Jacob Frey, who reminded listeners that the city's downtown will be protected by 2,000 National Guard members and 1,100 law enforcement officers during the trial of Derek Chauvin.

  • Not the most welcoming image for visitors.

The timing: Jury selection begins March 8 and could stretch deep into the spring, around the time when tourism is expected to pick back up.

  • "We will be open for business, especially ... through jury selection and the trial," Frey said. "We want Minneapolis residents and those visiting to be patronizing our businesses as much as possible."

This story first appeared in the Axios Twin Cities newsletter, designed to help readers get smarter, faster on the most consequential news unfolding in their own backyard.

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Go deeper

Feb 25, 2021 - Axios Twin Cities

Scoop: How much Minneapolis pays in taxes — and gets back in state aid

Photo: Aaron Lavinsky/Star Tribune via Getty Images

Minneapolis generated nearly $2 billion in tax revenue for the state in 2017 — 3.5 times more than what the city got back in state aid, per a new analysis commissioned by the Minneapolis Regional Chamber of Commerce.

Why it matters: The report, released to Axios yesterday, showcases the outsized role the state's largest city plays in Minnesota's overall economy — and the impact pandemic recovery here will have on the state as a whole.

Feb 25, 2021 - Axios Twin Cities

Read the Minneapolis "balance of payments" report

A new analysis commissioned by the Minneapolis Regional Chamber of Commerce breaks down how much Minneapolis pays — and gets — in state aid.

Read the full report and memo below:

Biden pledges to double U.S. climate funding to developing nations

U.S. President Joe Biden addresses the 76th Session of the U.N. General Assembly on September 21, 2021. (Eduardo Munoz-Pool/Getty Images)

Staring down a "borderless climate crisis," President Biden told the UN General Assembly on Tuesday that the U.S. will double public financial assistance to developing countries, including money to help them adapt to present-day climate impacts.

Why it matters: The failure of industrialized nations to fulfill a 2009 pledge to devote $100 billion annually to developing countries is a major impediment to a successful UN Climate Summit in Glasgow, which starts next month.