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Police officers during a demonstration in Minneapolis on Friday. Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

Minneapolis Public Schools announced Tuesday its board voted unanimously on Tuesday evening to end its contract with the city's police department following the death of George Floyd.

Details: The school board decided to terminate the $1.1 million contract because the actions of law enforcement after Floyd's death had "run directly counter to the values" of the district, BuzzFeed notes. Minneapolis Public Schools will not negotiate further with the police department.

Why it matters: It's a small win for protesters and civil rights groups that have long campaigned against having police in schools.

  • A 2018 Government Accountability Office report found black students in K-12 schools are disproportionately disciplined compared to other students of races.
  • A study from the Advancement Project, a nonprofit that focuses on racial justice issues, states: "Police in schools is an issue of American racial disparity that requires deep structural change."

What they're saying: School board chair Kim Ellison told the Star Tribune she values people, education and life. "Now I’m convinced, based on the actions of the Minneapolis Police Department, that we don’t have the same values.”

What's next: The school’s superintendent is preparing a safety plan for the board's meeting in August, per the Star Tribune.

Editor's note: This article has been updated with new details throughout.

Go deeper

Updated Sep 14, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Rochester police chief fired following Daniel Prude's death

A make shift memorial at the site where Daniel Prude was arrested in Rochester, New York. Photo: Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images)

Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren said Monday she's fired Police Chief La'Ron Singletary and suspended two others following protests over the police killing of Daniel Prude, a Black man says after being hooded and held down by local police.

Why it matters: The firing of Singletary comes almost a week after he announced his retirement. Activists have called for Singletary's resignation after details of Prude's March death surfaced recently, the Democrat and Chronicle notes. Warren accused Singletary of failing to properly brief her on the killing.

Off the Rails

Episode 4: Trump turns on Barr

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photos: Drew Angerer, Pool/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. Axios takes you inside the collapse of a president with a special series.

Episode 4: Trump torches what is arguably the most consequential relationship in his Cabinet.

Attorney General Bill Barr stood behind a chair in the private dining room next to the Oval Office, looming over Donald Trump. The president sat at the head of the table. It was Dec. 1, nearly a month after the election, and Barr had some sharp advice to get off his chest. The president's theories about a stolen election, Barr told Trump, were "bullshit."

In photos: Protests outside fortified capitols draw only small groups

Armed members of the far-right extremist group the Boogaloo Bois near the Michigan Capitol Building in Lansing on Jan. 17. About 20 protesters showed up, AP notes. Photo: Seth Herald/AFP via Getty Images

Small groups of protesters gathered outside fortified statehouses across the U.S. over the weekend ahead of President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.

The big picture: Some protests attracted armed members of far-right extremist groups but there were no reports of clashes, as had been feared. The National Guard and law enforcement outnumbered demonstrators, as security was heightened around the U.S. to avoid a repeat of the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riots, per AP.